THE CÁRPA'DOSÍA, THE BOOKS OF THE BEGINNINGS

(Elvish: "Books of the Beginnings"). The famous elven books about the myth of the creation of the world of Aér'aí'chán traded by the Axhái, the elder elves. The mythology introduced in the books is only accepted by the elves, all other races deny the existence of higher Gods than the twelve they worship.

The Cárpa'dosía - The Books of the Beginnings

An exact date when the Cárpa'dosía were written down is unknown, in fact there isn't even the slightest hint regarding this matter. It seems as if the elves in all parts of the known world have knowledge of the myths described in the Cárpa'dosía and that it is hopeless to find out where the myth originated. Many scholars tried to track back the elven myths to its sources, but have failed so far.

Book I of the Cárpa'dosía consist of eight chapters:

Book II of the Cárpa'dosía contains several myths which take place after Avá has already the left the world. The most important of these are:

In the following lines we try to give a short summary of the main Cárpa'dosían myth of world creation contained in Book I.

Avá, the Beautiful. According to the elven lore at the beginning there was Avá, the High Goddess, She who dreams the Dream of Dreams, the dream of Herself. She is called the One, the Only, the Eternal, the Great Mother, She Who Dreameth Forth All Things, finally Avá, the Compassionate, Avá, the Just and - most important for elven cosmology - Avá, the Beautiful. It was She who created the Elements (the Aér'aí'chanía), to make Her Dream real, the Gods (the Aviaría) to put order to the chaos and gave her spirit to the first elf, human, dwarf and orc through the Rain of Life upon the Tree of Life in order to let them dream their own dreams too.

Coór, the Shadow Himself. It is said that in Her Dream Avá got to know Herself only by viewing Her image in the universal mirror and the image of Herself was the Other of Herself, but this Other - as it became real - was Ésh-A, or also called Coór, the Shadow Himself. Every existing thing, every living creature, every idea is influenced and affected by the Great Darkness and cannot escape these bounds in the existing world.

The Perception of Avá. The destructive power of Coór nearly destroyed the Tree of Life, but Avá was frightened as She was unaware what had happend at this hour when She for the first time encountered Evil, which had emerged from Herself. Terrified from the view of the burned Tree Avá hid the Tree of Life from the eyes of the races. She wanted the Gods to give her answers, but the Gods had wandered the lands in human, dwarven, elven or orcish form during the Great Night and were unable to interfere in the catastrophe. The Gods answered that the upheaval could only have been initiated by Avá Herself. Puzzled, Avá looked out into the universe, sensing the unspeakable answer, but still not willing to accept it. Finally She shouted the ultimate question into the world: "Is it all me?" All She heard is Her echo, but in her echo She felt a deep, terrific voice, the voice of Evil. And as She looks at the world again She recognized in an apocalyptic vision that the face of the world was the face of a gigantic demon. Percepting that the world She's dreaming of indeed is the contrary picture of Herself and not Herself She realizes that Her goodness can only be perceived through the evil and Her beauty only through the ugly. Her only comfort lies in Her Thoughts of freedom She gave to the races to decide between the main principles, good and evil. It is an important aspect of this elven myth that the elves themselves, whose intentions concentrate on living the virtues of Avá only see the positive aspects of this unreconcileable dichotomy between the Light and the Shadow: It is their lives' essence to overcome the malices of Coór and to return their soul to the purity of Avá's beauty, to bathe in it in heavenly bliss, to be re-born finally and to overcome once again the enticements of the Shadow, finding a new path once more.

The Fear of the High Goddess. Although proud of Her creations but nevertheless disappointed with the outcome of Her Dream Avá thought about waking up from the Dream, destroying everything She had accomplished. But She couldn't. For there was one Thought in Her heart She couldn't cope with: The Thought that She couldn't awake, because She might realize to be just the Dream of another. There's only one very vague hint indicated by Avá's last expressed Thought that this other might be Her supposed creation itself...


Avá's Leaving of the World. As the Dreamer of the world, Avá the Mother of All, turned away from the world, Coór reigned over Aér'ai'chán. Coór was there from the beginning of time, as He was the All the Mother of All had created. Coór gathered "Coór'enín" (meaning "the Many" or "those who are being dark") around Him to support his intention of leading the Aér'aí'chán back to chaos. The Coór'enín were those High Spirits who had been neglected by Avá as she instructed the High Spirits to organize chaos. Coór reigned from this time onward many years over the world of Aér'ai'chán and mainly the orcs worshipped the Coór'enín, the Dark Gods, and became devoted to His cause. Many wars followed on all continents and the fight between and good and evil are still not over and will last till the end of time, when the Dream of Avá begins and ends.

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