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Rayne (Alýr)
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« on: 24 October 2012, 10:12:05 »

a) Categorization: Vegetables


b) Overview: The Honeynut Squash is a common squash grown throughout the Kingdom of Santharia, though it prefers the moderate temperatures of Xaramon, Enthronia, and Vardynn. The squash itself is long and bulbous in shape, a little plumper at one end than the other, and is usually orange or orange-yellow in colour, though it may also come in orange-brown. Honeynut Squashes are commonly harvested in autumn and used in any number of dishes including casseroles and breads.


c) Description: The Honeynut Squash plant, like many squash plants, is a vining plant. From a single seedling it creeps across the earth, releasing roots to burrow into the ground for nutrients. Honeynut Squash is a hardy plant that can expand easily, growing into a 2 ped by 2 ped plot quickly.

The roots, pale in colour, are shallow, so Honeynut Squash is often grown in close proximity to corn, whose root system does not compete with the squash. In addition, the Honeynut squash’s large leaves shade the ground, helping to prevent weeds from cropping up. The leaves are a pale or dusty green colour, and can expand to nearly two palmspans long. The leaves are five-lobed with pointed ends and rough edges, but are very soft and supple. The undersides are covered in a fine fur.

Come late summer, the Honeynut Squash plant produces large, orange-yellow flowers, not unlike lily flowers. Five-petalled and occasionally freckled by small black or brown spots, the flowers can expand to the size of a large man’s hand. They are lovely and it’s tempting to pluck them to decorate one’s dinner table or place it the kitchen window, particularly as they are rather sweet-smelling. However, to do so would be to rob oneself of the delectable treasures to come.

The flowers wither away by early autumn and begin to form into fruit. The left-over base of the flower grows larger and larger, turning from light green to yellow to Sor'inyt orange and swelling until it is a fore and a half long!—though of course, they can get much larger. According to the Dogodan Honeynut Squash Competition Historical Registry, the largest Honeynut Squash grown among the tribe was a few nailsbreadths shy of a ped long!

The Honeynut Squash is usually harvested in mid to late autumn, though it will keep all winter if stored in a cool place. Cut into it, and you’ll smell the reason for the squash’s name, for its aroma is sweet and nutty (an apt reflection of its taste). The seeds of the Honeynut Squash, located in a hollow pocket in the plumpest section of the fruit, are several, usually about half a nailsbreadth long and orange-coloured.


d) Territory: The Honeynut Squash can be found throughout the Kingdom of Santharia, from the warm farms bordering Bardavos to the magical gardens of Ximax Academy, from the rolling hills of the Dogodan Hobbits to the peaceful grounds of the Duke of Nermeran. The Honeynut Squash is an adaptable plant, and will grow most anywhere provided the land isn’t too shady and the soil isn’t too wet.

Though many Honeynut Squash seeds can be sown at once, the average gardener doesn’t generally plant but a handful per season (usually in mid-summer). Particularly in mid-Santharia, where the squash grows with great fecundity, it’s a waste of seeds to plant more than a few a time. With the Honeynut Squash, the most important tip is not to over-water it; most gardeners don’t need to water it but every other day while it is sprouting, and then leave it alone until harvest.


e) Usages: Perhaps the most obvious use of the Honeynut Squash is as a food item. Because of its prevalence, it has worked its way into all sorts of dishes. For the lazy cook, roasting bite-size pieces of the squash over a flame is a satisfying autumn repast; a baker might find a suitable use for the squash as an addition to breads and muffins. Those for whom cooking is a métier may work the Honeynut Squash into a flavourful casserole, a frabjous stuffing, or a soothing soup. The squash can even simply be cooked, mashes, and served with a bit of butter (and just a splash of citrus!) as a compliment to roast teanish or cured ham.

Ingesting the Honeynut Squash is assumed to have some positive somatic benefits: it is generally assumed to kill or weaken internal parasites, such as worms. For those who suffer mightily from such deleterious pests, it is recommended you see your local herbalist. He or she will likely have some sort of salubrious mixture that includes Honeynut Squash seeds that have been roasted, ground, and mixed with oils and a dash of lemon juice. Depending on the progression of your bodily infestation, it will likely be recommended you take a bit of this concoction 2-3 times a day. And consuming a bit of the squash itself on a regular basis couldn’t hurt either!


f) Reproduction: The Honeynut Squash has a fairly well-observed lifecycle. From a small seed, planted in the good, dry soil in early or mid-summer, a seedling will sprout in about a week, and quickly expand into curious tendrils moving over the ground like a leafy fog. In mid- or late summer, the flowers will blossom, inviting malise and other insects to bathe in their pollen before they depart.

In early autumn, the squash has already begun to swell, growing larger and larger (and oranger and oranger) until they reach maturity in mid to late autumn, when they are harvested. If kept in cool conditions, the squash can last all winter, though they have come to define the colours of autumn, and are happily consumed during this season. Farmers may collect the seeds, which will last until next season, when they are planted and the cycle starts again.


g) Myth/Lore: While the Honeynut Squash has not particular stories connected to it, it’s worth mentioning that the squash has strong associations with Jeyriall. Whenever Jeyriall is depicted with a harvest, there is almost always a Honeynut Squash among the corn and gourds in her cornucopia. The squash itself has, in some ways, helped to define the autumn season, and many hobbits say that winter comes not until the Honeynut Squash is roasted (or the Honeynut Squash bread is baked, or the Honeynut Squash casserole is cooked… I suppose it really depends on the hobbit).
« Last Edit: 16 March 2013, 16:49:50 by Artimidor Federkiel » Logged

"There is much misjudgment in the world. Now, I knew you for a unicorn when I first saw you, and I know that I am your friend. Yet you take me for a clown, or a clod, or a betrayer, and so I must be if you see me so. The magic on you is only magic and will vanish as soon as you are free, but the enchantment of error that you put on me I must wear forever in your eyes. We are not always what we seem..." -Schmendrick the Magician, The Last Unicorn
Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang
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« Reply #1 on: 20 January 2013, 05:44:27 »

A lovely little entry, neatly written. It's not very fantastickal, if I may put it this way, but not every entry needs to be, and the hobbits will be glad of this odoriferous addition to their larder.

Yellow for typos, orange for whimsical remarks:

Quote
The flowers wither away by early autumn and begin to form into fruit. The left-over base of the flower grows larger and larger, turning from light green to yellow to orange and swelling until it is a fore and a half long!—though of course, they can get much larger. According the Dogodan Honeynut Squash Competition Historical Registry, the largest Honeynut Squash grown among the tribe was a few nailsbreadths sky of a ped long!
... According to the ...
 ... shy ...

Quote
Those whom cooking is a métier may work the Honeynut Squash into a flavorful casserole, a frabjous :) stuffing, or a soothing soup. The squash can even simply be cooked, mashes, and served with a bit of butter (and just a splash of citrus!) as a compliment to roast teanish or cured ham.
... Those for whom ...
... taenish ...

"frabjous": it's always a pleasure to hail a fellow connoisseur of Jabberworky!


Quote
Reproduction: The Honeybut Squash has a fairly well-observed lifecycle.
... Honeynut ...

Quote
In early autumn, the squash has already begun to swell, growing larger and larger (and oranger and oranger) until they reach maturity in mid to late autumn, when they are harvested. If kept in cool conditions, the squash can last all winter, though they have come to define the colors of autumn, and are happily consumed during this season. Farmers may collect the seeds, which will last until next season, when then are planted and the cycle starts again.
... they ...

Oranger and oranger, and curiouser and curiouser?


There are a few American spellings in here (color, flavorful), but I understand that Arti corrects those automatically?


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« Reply #2 on: 20 January 2013, 23:34:50 »

a) Categorization: Vegetables


b) Overview: The Honeynut Squash is a common squash grown throughout the Kingdom of Santharia, though it prefers the moderate temperatures of Xaramon, Enthronia, and Vardynn. The squash itself is long and bulbous in shape, a little plumper at one end than the other, and is usually orange or orange-yellow in color, though it may also come in orange-brown Would this be Lyth'bel Pollen to Elken? I'm just thinking it would be fun/realistic to use Santharian colors. But maybe we should put some Earthly colors in parenthesis, since I keep forgetting what they mean. Honeynut Squashes are commonly harvested in autumn and used in any number of dishes including casseroles and breads.


....The roots, pale in color, are shallow, so Honeynut Squash is often grown in close proximity to corn, whose root system does not compete with the squash. In addition, the Honeynut squash’s large leaves shade the ground, helping to prevent weeds from cropping up. The leaves are a pale or dusty green color Herne Green?, and can expand to nearly two palmspans long. The leaves are five-lobed with pointed ends and rough edges, but are very soft and supple. The undersides are covered in a fine fur.

Come late summer, the Honeynut Squash plant produces large, orange-yellow Lyth'bel Pollen? flowers, not unlike lily flowers. Five-petalled and...

The flowers wither away by early autumn and begin to form into fruit. The left-over base of the flower grows larger and larger, turning from light green to yellow to orange Styruine to yellow to Sor'inyt Orange? and swelling until it is a fore and a half long! Avoid exclamation marks if possible. They yell and you might end up reading them twice.—though of course, they can get much larger. According the Dogodan Honeynut Squash Competition Historical Registry, the largest Honeynut Squash grown among the tribe was a few nailsbreadths sky of a ped long!

The Honeynut Squash is usually harvested in mid to late autumn, though it will keep all winter if stored in a cool place. Cut into it, and you’ll smell the reason for the squash’s name, for its aroma is sweet and nutty (an apt reflection of and so is its taste). The seeds of the Honeynut Squash, located in a hollow pocket in the plumpest section of the fruit, are several, usually about half a nailsbreadth long and orange-colored Yealm Beige or Lyth'bel Pollen, if colored like most squash seeds; if not, maybe Sor'inyt Orange?.

...Though many Honeynut Squash seeds can be sown at once, the average gardener doesn’t generally plant but a handful per season (usually in mid-summer). Particularly in mid-Santharia, where the squash grows with great fecundity, it’s a waste of seeds to plant more than a few a time. With the Honeynut Squash, the most important tip is not to to not? Gah, English isn't my first language. over-water it; most gardeners don’t need to water it but every other day while it is sprouting, and then leave it alone until harvest.

e) Usages: Perhaps the most obvious use of the Honeynut Squash is as a food item. Because of its prevalence, it has worked its way into all sorts of dishes. For the lazy cook, roasting bite-size pieces of the squash over a flame is a satisfying autumn repast; a baker might find a suitable use for the squash as an addition to breads and muffins. Those to whom cooking is a métier may work the Honeynut Squash into a flavorful casserole, a frabjous stuffing, or a soothing soup. The squash can even simply be cooked, mashed, and served with a bit of butter (and just a splash of citrus!) as a compliment to roast teanish or cured ham.

...Ingesting the Honeynut Squash is assumed to have some positive somatic I don't like the word somatic. It's too scientific and Earth-y. What about using the word health instead? benefits: it is generally assumed to kill or weaken internal parasites, such as worms. For those who suffer mightily from such deleterious pests, it is recommended you see your local herbalist. He or she will likely have some sort of salubrious mixture that includes Honeynut Squash seeds that have been roasted, ground, and mixed with oils and a dash of lemon juice. Depending on the progression of your bodily infestation, it will likely be recommended you take a bit of this concoction 2-3 times a day. And consuming a bit of the squash itself on a regular basis couldn’t hurt either!


f) Reproduction: The Honeybut Squash has a fairly well-observed lifecycle. From a small seed, planted in the good, dry soil in early or mid-summer Do you really put a dash here? Or is a space missing?, a seedling will sprout in about a week, and quickly expand into curious tendrils moving over the ground like a leafy fog. In mid- or late summer, the flowers will blossom, inviting malise and other insects to bath bathe; bath is when you wash others in their pollen before they depart.

In early autumn, the squash has already begun to swell, growing larger and larger (and oranger and oranger I think you say more orange? Or just darker?) until they reach maturity in mid to late autumn, when they are harvested. If kept in cool conditions, the squash can last all winter, though they have come to define the colors of autumn, and are happily consumed during this season. Farmers may collect the seeds, which will last until next season, when then are planted and the cycle starts again....
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Rayne (Alýr)
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« Reply #3 on: 04 March 2013, 18:34:12 »

Winter is melting, and so am I--from the jagged northern mountains toward the shallow river valley. The transformation comes slowly, the sun dispersing her light in fragments. And every chilly wind blows me back, and every night freezes me into ice, but there is enough of spring to occasionally shutter me into a warmer self.

How the time passes!--forgive me that I've been away so long. Winter has kept me to my chilly, internet-less house (or to the apartment of my friends, blessed with plumping and heaters!). But I am back, at least long enough to make some changes.


@Shabakuk: Thank you! Yes, Lewis Carroll's an old friend; I'm glad you picked up on two of my references! I was in a bit of whimsical mood when I wrote this originally (I must have been reading something fanciful! Now I'm dark and brooding from murder mysteries.  devilish ) I have taken all your suggestions. Thank you!


@Sparkle: Thank you for your comments!--And it's a pleasure (I don't believe we've met before). I hope to get to know you through our tandem participation here. I agree with your comments to use more Santharian colour terms, and have incorporated these in some situations; at others, I have left them out. As you mention, sometimes it's difficulty to connect the colour term to the more terran term, color, or idea. Some of your comments (exclamation points, "oranger and oranger") I've decided not to take for stylistic reasons. Being heavily associated with Hobbits, I wanted this entry to have a bit more light-heartedness associated with it. I agree that sometimes we must curb our styles to ensure a level of consistency and understanding, but I think certain styles also make some entries more enjoyable and entertaining to read (like Shaba's!).

I've kept "somatic"; I don't have the same associations, I think, as you do. Somatic can be scientific, but it also developed a little whimsy from its root, "soma", which is associated in fantasy literature and video games as a kind of delicious drink/drink of the gods. (I think it's also used or referenced in the Vedas or some other story or stories of Indian origin?--don't quote me on that.) As for "not to over-water", I feared that Athviaro/Lief would appear wielding his fearsome axe of grammatical retribution and... chide me for splitting the infinitive, but if it sounds awkward, I have no qualms against changing it. For me, ease of understanding trumps grammatical correctness every time.

And mid-summer, according to dictionary, has a dash or else is a single word (midsummer). Because I use "early" previously, I wanted to imply some separation between "mid" and "summer".


If there are any other comments or suggestions, let me know. I would love to finish off this and many of the other entries. (... that's the murder mysteries talking.)
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« Reply #4 on: 15 March 2013, 04:40:49 »

I'll mark this one as well for integration - comments have been integrated and/or explained in case the the old version was kept, so I'd say we're good to go here as well :)
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