Santharian Development

Santharian World Development => Miscellaneous => Topic started by: Bard Judith on 24 July 2007, 21:11:21



Title: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Bard Judith on 24 July 2007, 21:11:21
This is the original entry, without comments - the other thread was salvaged by Talia and has her commentary interspersed - but as it wasn't coloured it's difficult to tell what are my ideas and what are her critiques or suggestions.  So - here's the original, PLUS the graphics which should make things a lot clearer!  Comments are of course welcome but can be added, in the usual way, below this post for discussion and integration.

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Music of Sarvonia

Disclaimer:  Please note that this Compendium entry only applies to the Sarvonian continent, and is not used exclusively even there.  The northern tribes have their own method of notating music, and the oral/aural traditions of the southern clans do not require written records. Likewise, it only deals with the human system of classification, pitch, notation, and melody.  For a sample of elven musical literature, please see the entry on Salaen, a type of Ylfferhim folk music.  The Thergerim also use their own instruments, pitches, and notation; see the entry on Dwarven Music.   However, in this entry we hope to provide a general sampling of human musical conventions for your edification.  Please enjoy!

Overview:

All tones, notes, melodies, songs, instruments, etc. belong in one of four elements and one of four ranges.  This provides a possible sixteen categories for classification.  Some of the classifications of certain instruments may seem quite arbitrary; as they arise out of a very ancient tradition and are associated with the alchemic mysteries, it can be difficult to explain them in our contemporary understanding of music and how the sounds are actually produced.  It suffices to say that our ancestors were more concerned with effects than with processes, as certain instruments which we might seemingly define as wind-operated, such as the flute or pipe, are not classified as Wind instruments.   And while some Earth instruments, most notably the dwarven-made, are percussive, not all drums fall into that category.  Refer to the table below for some examples of accepted classifications.

CHART ONE - SEE BELOW

Musical Instruments – some common definitions

* Windsinger – a large recorder or pipe formed from a long cross-section of the Windsong giant grass, a variant of bamboo which grows well in the warm, damp tropical regions of Caelereth.  Note that the instrument should not be confused with a member of the elven clerical group known as the ‘Windsingers’ or Ava’shae’llae…

* Bubblechanters – a peculiar set of pipes with a portable bellows (a bag of thickly woven cloth) attached, so the player need not use any of his own wind to create the sound.  The instrument must be belted on so that the bag or ‘bubble’ is fastened under the right arm, with one side of the bellows attached to the side of the chest, the other to the arm above the elbow.  Thus by moving the bent arm outwards and inwards the bellows are continually pumped, and the air flows through the pipes, or ‘chanters’. 

* Solcornet – a bifurcated primitive trumpet formed from the horns of the sacrificial cow dedicated to Grothar at the Winter Solstice festival.  It plays two notes as a chord, usually ‘Ey’ and ‘Os’ (see Musical Notation, below)
* Krumhorn – a Thergerim-manufactured wind instrument.  It is a long, hollow tube constructed of spliced animal horn, about a ped and a half in length, curving upwards and flaring outwards at the bottom, containing three simple metal valves just below the mouthpiece which in combination allow a very low five or six-note range.

* Cyrathaelan or Elven Pipe – The name is derived from the Styrash, meaning ‘gentle music-maker’.  This slim cylinder of hollowed wood is apparently carved intricately; however, according to the Aellenrhim woodworkers who produce it, no blades are used in the manufacture of these instruments.  Rather, the shrub from which it is formed is ‘encouraged’ to twine its delicate tendrils around a metal core until the desired shape, length, and overlay has been achieved.  At this point it is removed through a simple incantation and given only the most gentle polishing with a silken cloth to bring up the shine of the wood.  The tuning holes are likewise not drilled, but left as natural spaces.

* Meldarine - the well-known Wood Xylophone, a row of slender wooden slats supported by a carved wooden stand.  The material is generally Meldarapple or Malus wood, which not only gives a pleasant, naturally resonant tone, but also lends a lovely roseate hue to the finished xylophone.  It is played with two medlarwood mallets.

* Guitar

* Dwarven Drum

* Brass Panpipes

* Agelom – an elven-designed stringed instrument associated with Nehtor, resembling a lute. “It has six double strings stretched over a cavity that is the sound box, flanked by a scratch board to protect the instrument from the movement of a plectrum, usually carefully made from rock or wood…”

* Trumpet

* Resonance Organ – The motivation to design this marvelous keyboard instrument came directly from the sound of the Resonance Dragon (which see); after nearly a half-century of experimentation with various fabrics, leathers, reeds, pipes, and other materials in an attempt to duplicate the fabled resonating tones of the Dragon’s webbing,  the skilled Féarn’teloría bards and builders have given us the organ in its current form.  Great cast-aurium pipes rise from the back of a bellows-box, just over the head of a ‘pumpman’ or ‘bellowslad’ who must treadle the two seat-print-sized foot pedals constantly to keep the voice of the organ alive.  At the front, a keyboard of Avennorian whale tusk keys set into baychwood arms allows the musician to open or close the flow of air through the pipes at will.  Each ivory key is engraved with its appropriate note, from ‘Deep Ey’ through ‘Low Ey’, ‘Mid Ey’, and ‘High Ey’, all the way up to ‘True Ey’, a full four pantheons! (See Musical Notation, below)  The casing of the bellows and keyboard cabinet is carved with a scale pattern and stained in various colours to suggest the beauty of the Resonance Dragon which inspired it.  Woven ‘webbing’, strictly decorative, is draped from side to side of the pipe gallery, and the pipes themselves glint with the golden glow of aurium.

(hoping someone will be inspired to do a picture of this, as it’s truly the most marvelous musical instrument in Caelereth! )

* Chimes
* Lap Harp

*Bavonesta – a series of crystalline tubes or tall pure glass jars, filled with sea water in varying amounts so as to produce a clear, ringing tone when tapped with a driftwood striker.  The frame which supports the tubes is almost always formed from patina bronze, and a sea motif is common – leaping dolphins, seaweeds, or shells – on the facing panel.

* Floor Harp


Musical Pitch, Tuning, Scales, and Notation

Pitch:  is taken from the “Madman’s Voice”, a hand-sized device made of two identical metal wires stretched over a blocky square soundbox with a short neck and two heavy tuning pegs at the top.  The ‘Voice’ resembles a crude miniature lute; despite its apparent simplicity it must be made with absolute craftsmanship and sized with precision.  The wood used is always Eur’oak, dried ten seasons and planed to a particular thickness, while the two wires, or strings, must be made from mithril of a specific length (and poured, cut and drawn in the same batch on the same day...) 

The way in which pitch is determined is this: since mithril has a consistent breaking point under extremely high tension, the ‘Voice’ is cranked to its absolute limit.  One string (nicknamed the ‘Bachelor’) is taken to trembling poise, the note plucked and heard, then set as ‘below true’ by the assembled musicians who are waiting for their pitch.  The other string, or ‘Fishwife’, is then pulled to equal tautness and just beyond.  Her note is heard and adjusted for, and then it is the ‘Bachelor’s’ turn again.  In this rather nerve-wracking way the pitch slowly climbs to a shriek of pure silvery pain, and is ‘recorded’ by the listening soprano instruments – for the alto and tenor instruments a full pantheon (octave) below in range, while the basses simply wait.   Eventually one of the strings, stretched to its complete limit, will snap wildly, with a plangent twang that has now become familiar to every New Santhalan audience member – that ‘madman’s shriek’ that signals the orchestra is almost ready to take its place upon the stage.  At that point the note on the other string is deemed to be the highest achievable pitch, and the orchestra has its absolute – its ‘True Ey’ (the Terran high Doh, or three semitones above A440)  – see below for a comparative list of note names). 

Of course, if the orchestra is fortunate enough to be performing in a space where one of the famous Resonance Organs resides, the smallest pipe will have been tuned to True Ey and the musicians may take their notes safely from it.  As there are only seven of these instruments in existence so far, (four in New Santhala, one at the Féarn’teloría,  one in Marcogg, and one in Bardavos) the Madman’s Voice is in no danger of becoming obsolete in the near future. 

Scales: A full range of notes is called a ‘span’, or ‘pantheon’.  There are twelve notes within the pantheon, each given a syllable that stands for one of the twelve deities of the Aviaria.  Certain pitches are believed to have certain characteristics, and thus considered appropriate for the qualities of those deities.  Thus each note name always has a consistent pitch associated with it, again, based on ‘True Ey’.  The pitches are divided approximately equally into twelve notes or tones,  from True Ey downwards to its mate one pantheon below. (equal temperament, in Terran nomenclature)  Here they are given from Low Ey upward to Mid Ey.

Ey, Neh, Ba, Ah, Je, Ur, Eh, Os, Se, Goh, Fo, Que 

The pantheons are, in order, from lowest to highest, called 'Deep', 'Low', ' Mid', ' High',  and 'True'.

 The roots of this system of musical naming are also believed to have strong ties with the alchemical theories and philosophies developed in the early ages of Sarvonian history.  Again, a chart is given below to assist in comprehension.

CHART TWO - SEE BELOW

Since each pitch has its own name, music can be written – and read back - exactly like a sentence, using one syllable, or pantheon name, to represent each note.  The length of the note is shown by a ‘breathbar’, or horizontal line which extends through the syllable.  Chords are represented by stacking the breathbars with their associated syllable.  An example of this musical notation is shown in the parchment below.


PARCHMENT ONE - SEE BELOW


More recently a style among younger bards has become popularized which simplifies the syllables of the pantheon down to one character each, struck through with the appropriate breathbar length.  The main appeal of this style of musical notation is its speed in composition; for the singer or musician interpreting the piece, the old familiar system must be relearnt and translated as they go.  Nonetheless, it is gaining in popularity and there are those who predict that it will completely replace the old ‘scribed’ pantheon.  An example is given below, in the hand of Lucirina of Bardavos.

 
PARCHMENT TWO - SEE BELOW


With thanks to:  http://www.uk-piano.org/history/pitch.html   and
 http://www.cechinatrans.demon.co.uk/ctm-psm.html



Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 24 July 2007, 21:29:37
Yayyyy!!! its so much clearer now!! :grin: :heart:

Ok im really curious so be prepared for a barrage of questions... ;)

.Do santharians use keys like terran music, for instance is there a key of Ey or Ah, if so do they all contain different numbers of sharps or flats?

.How do you write bass cleff etc, is it raised a major third from whats written like terran music or is it just the same noted

.In the notation how would you distinguish from a high Ey and a low Ey.

.what happened to that gittare entry that guy did?

.Is there a santharian equivelant to the pentatonic scale?

oh.. im sorry  for wittering on...This is GREAT by the way bard, especially with the images, they make it so much clearer, im goin to be glued to this for a while!!! :heart: :thumbup:


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Gean Firefeet on 25 July 2007, 00:38:28
Time to get mixed up in this topic. Dear Bard, I was going to PM you about reviving this entry, but it's about time we finalize this sketch and get over with. Therefore, I'd like to note the following:

We need a general entry on music, for now the human Santharian version. This entry you should cover history/origin of music, notation, instruments, legend and lore, usage.

The listed entry will, in the course of time, each need their separate entries, just like the Harp currently in the works by Petros. We need to make a general template for that, see the proposal further down below.

As soon as we have this, similar versions can be developed for other races and continents.

Proposed template for instruments

Overview

General introduction to the instruments, classification, giving a few basic details on what it is and why it is important, perhaps a note on origin.

Description

Cover the general design of the instrument, including different elements of the instrument, the material, the dimensions, different types. Besides this, also note the musical characteristics: possible keys to play in, range from highest to lowest note, timbre and dynamical possibilities.

Production

As the instrument is the work of craftmanship, you should give details on the production process, referring to the description where you've noted the relevant elements and materials. Also note the locations of production, is the industry might be a monopoly of one tribe or town, or available in even the smallest village of Santharia.

Playing
Give an account or introduction to 'playing the [instrument]', noting different styles and fingering/pressure/embouchure possibilities.

Usage

Not every instrument is used at every occasion, nor all over the Santharian Kingdom. Note both the occasions were the instrument is used and the people or locations of usage.

Origin and History

Often an instrument was developed by one tribe and gradually spread over the continent. Note the relevant details here, possibly with technical development, inventor and similar details.

Legend and Lore

The lyre, to name but one Terran example, has a right history including illustrious mythological figures like King David and Orpheus. Here you can note similar stories about your instrument, if of course relevant to your entry.



Now to your questions Petros, I'll answer them from my point of view and hope that Bard Judith will shine her light over it as well.

Keys seem a logical thing to have. I wouldn't complicate matters instantly by delving into different kind of keys, but it would be logical to designate the key of the piece, by noting this with the appropiate syllable in front of the 'note syllables', if you understand what I mean.

Concerning the Bass clef: clefs were only designed to extend the range of notational possibilities. With our current notation system we have a serious problem with heights, as I haven't seen the possibility to note octaves up or down from 'standard'. This immediately brings us to your third question, and for now I must say I haven't the foggiest. Perhaps we should think of writing some syllable lower than others, or higher, to designate a different octave?

About the Guitar entry, it's over here (http://www.santharia.com/dev/index.php?topic=9715.0) in this forum, but I think it was never finished. I hope the current discussion might prove the push to finishing that one as well.

It sounds great to have a Santharian equivalent to the pentatonic scale, though I'm sure you're aware there are in fact five different pentatonic scales. I was going to propose that your pixie harp would have five vines so to say, so that it would be able to produce pentatonic melodies.

Hope I helped a little!


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 25 July 2007, 02:37:25
Well done Gean! in my opinion that layout is perfect! :grin:

The only problem is that youve missed out the two most important aspects of a musical instrument...
Timbre and its dynamical capabilities, so.. you could put in a heading for them aswell maybe? ;)

i was also thinking about something, There is a forum about language and runes yet there is no forum for santharian music!?!
Music and art are the basis of culture and culture is the foundations of a society!
So once weve got the layout of musical entries sorted, you could ask Art about this or something. Cause it would be really cool to have a section dedicated to music, and as an added feature you could upload your musical compositions straight to the forum perhaps.. ;)




Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 25 July 2007, 03:15:11
We've tried to reduce the amount of Forums recently instead of increasing it, Petros. It just got too much and still is too much perhaps. Music related entries (instruments, general music stuff) are best kept under the Miscellaneous section on the site - as you can see we don't have a single standalone entry in this regard yet, so it's not that there's a lot happening here. Though I encourage that this entry here is continued and finalized - it looks great so far, especially with these nice illustrations to go with it! :D

Musical pieces go in the Santharian Artists Workshop and Resources, and so far that has worked out as well, don't see much need to change that neither. It has been practical enough so far I'd say.


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Gean Firefeet on 25 July 2007, 03:15:37
Hey Petros, your enthusiasm is heartwarming, yet not so hasty. Indeed you could say that culture is at the heart of society (eek, MTV and Die Hard 4.0 are the basis of our culture?), but we have a forum dedicated to music and the sister arts: the Artist Workshop, more to the top of the development section.

You'll find some of my compositions there as well. What I've done so far is uploading them myself and provide a link to them. Currently we don't have an option to upload straight tot he forum, but if you need anything uploaded, Art is always there to help, he's done so often enough.

Your worthwhile additions have been wrapped into the template above, under the heading description.

Art beat me to it :D


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 25 July 2007, 03:21:17
Oopsie (silly little me!! :)) sorry for the bother!!


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 25 July 2007, 03:25:15
Additional note: If we get more music entries done we can open up an own sub-section in the Misc. menu called "Music". So far the only standalone entry on music we have is under "Culture and Customs" (Salaen Folk Music). Once it makes sense to seperate it, we can do so.


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Bard Judith on 25 July 2007, 04:11:19
Quick note ere I lay my weary head down:  I can answer one question right on the spot. 

 Octaves are called 'pantheons' in Santharia, and - I quote - "The pantheons are, in order, from lowest to highest, called 'Deep', 'Low', ' Mid', ' High',  and 'True'."   As humans don't have a vocal range of more than five octaves/pantheons,  nor do most musical instruments, five pantheons should suffice. 

 Thus if you are playing a piece in the key of C, say, and you start on Middle C, in Santharian notation that would be indicated as 'Mid Ey'.    Now, if you are reading the syllables, it gets too long and complex to write a song as

"Mid Ey      Mid Ey      Mid Je      Mid Je     Mid Ur    Mid Ur      M i d J e " - so I propose to put a small 'hook' or 'dot' on the end of the strike-through of the syllable to show where it sits RELATIVE to the pantheon indicated at the beginning of the piece (just as the key is given in Terran music).

A strikethrough that curves upwards indicates a 'high' note - that is, one in the pantheon above the original 'key' - while a strikethrough that curves down shows that it is a 'low' note, belonging to the pantheon below the original 'key'. 


Gean - the template is awesome! 

Everyone, thanks for critique and comment so far - will post more tomorrow - must to bed now...


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 25 July 2007, 04:25:53
Sorry to be a wee nuisence again, but there one thing i dont get, how can you tell how long a strike through can last for (its probably metioned above, but im a wee bit simple ;)) i know that the longer it goes on for, the longer the note is, but how will the player calculate this. will there be a particular speed written on the manusript like terran music so he can count through the strike through? or is it just the lenght of time it takes her/him to read over the line.

sorry again!! :heart:


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Ta`lia of the Seven Jewels on 25 July 2007, 05:04:13
Petros. keep in mind, that we are speaking about medieval music and notation. Not everything has to be fixed till the last iota, there was much more room for interpretation.

Judy, did you integrate my comment already or are they lost now? I don't have the time to go through it again.


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Gean Firefeet on 25 July 2007, 05:46:53
Talia is right in this respect. I'd go for relative timing in contrast to the absolute timing our Terran music system has. The longer the 'strike through', the longer the note is. The player will then adapt this to the time signature so that it'll fit in nicely. I'm currently studying French Baroque music by Pancrace Royer, a contemporary of better known composers like Couperin and Rameau. If you listen to the recording of his clavichord pieces, you'll find that the player is free in both melody and rhythm, and also with his decoration. It's only in the 19th century that the notation becomes so fixed, because the music becomes that complex.

So, a long note line, is just a 'long note', not a note of 3, 4 or 3.5 beats...

I'll ask Art to put the template in the 'template thread'.


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 25 July 2007, 06:25:18
Yeah i guess so.. ( got a bit carried away :grin:)

By the way Gean Strictness in timing has not just popped up at the dawn of the contemporary era, but has been around since Johannes de Garlandia's De mensurabili musica (rythmic modes)(-just felt like saying the posh name! :grin:) I wasnt suggesting modern strictness or anything, but because santharia is like the terran medieval era its musical notation could be similar to the Mensural notation ( 13th century) and might i add that mensural is nearly identical to modern notation and its rythym excpt that they look different, but the principals are all the same! I accept the fact that baroque era is more free than modern music but music has been oppresed by rythym precision since we developed from neumonic notation. and i have you know i was playing Mozarts Clarinet concerto in A major the other day and i was up to my ears in Cadenzas!! :P


Whoa...i finally used my advanced higher musical theory, i never knew i was capable!  (this will probably be the first and last time ;))


OMG im so sorry, i like totally bit your head off :shocked: please accept my humble apology!! :) :hug:

Achh well... its good to have a wee musical debate now and then!!


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Ta`lia of the Seven Jewels on 25 July 2007, 07:39:35
Why an apology in the same post if you could actually edit that post? ;)


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 25 July 2007, 07:50:53
i wanted my view to come across, and at the same time not be to brash ( if you catch my drift). ;) 
Boy, TaliaYour good!! :P


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Gean Firefeet on 25 July 2007, 08:48:28
Bit my head off? Don't worry, I have several ;)

No really, I'm all ears (besides several heads, that is ;)) for that kind of thing. I never had Garlandia in my classes, though modal rhythm is familiar. I rarely deal with pre-Ars Nova music, so forgive my ignorance. And only lately I performed medievil dances together with a recorder player, and that was a rare exception of music I play before 1600... but anyway, we're digressing, aren't we. Let's hope the Bard drops in for a more elaborate answer :D


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Bard Judith on 25 July 2007, 11:30:55
Talia - sorry I didn't make that clear!   What I have up top is ONLY my original post - however, your comments are all still preserved in the FIRST post of the old entry.   I need to go through and pick them out and respond/integrate/debate as necessary - however, since it wasn't formatted other people couldn't possibly tell what was my work and what was your extensive commentary.   I'm effectively starting from scratch - but don't worry, you don't have to. 

Gean and Petros:  a musical debate is generally called opera!

And yes, I do intend this system to be flexible and relative.  There is no time signature in this system - one needs to look at the strike line and choose a tempo.   I'm thinking of making a syllable with NO strike be 'the fastest possible'  - for runs and arpeggios and quavers, for example.  Other notations (thanks, Talia!) may very well be written in either as words ('to be played slowly and sensitively') or as artistic flourishes (like a hold line)   

If we bear in mind that this system of notation is fairly recent in Santharian history, it would make sense that it is also by comparison a yet un-elaborated and simple system, having had no time to accrue the various complexities and sophistications with which time would gift it.   Music was/is still transmitted orally from bard to bard - which is why Gean and Judith and their ilk spend a lot of time on the road collecting the stuff rather than paying SanthEx or SPS (Sarvonian Postal System) to send them packets of manuscripts and CDs every month!


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 26 July 2007, 05:47:25
Side note: Gean's Instrument Template suggestion was now added to the sticky topic here on "How to..." Don't bother about it showing up in a post of Judy, I just removed a bunch of posts there clearing things up and edited this template in. I also brought all the other templates there in proper shape, so that they look the same now. Will do anchor links like in the sticky Places thread as well a bit later.

The template will also be included next update on the "Misc. Development Rules" page directly on the site.


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 01 September 2007, 09:52:24
Bumping, so that i dont have to keep flicking back to page two!! :heart: :D


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 01 September 2007, 21:47:36
Sand Flute:

The only genuine wind instrument set upon the Percussion Table. The sand flute is a small flute (1.5 handspans in length) made entirely of stone. Its hard and heavy bore gifts it with a beautiful mellow tone, that should be played amongst the rest of the wind section, but sadly this little flute has been shunned from the lime light becase most Flautists regard it as a practice flute, or as a cheap starter instrument before you are ready to make a big musical investment. Its main orchestral use is to be a fourth harmonious part when a fourth flute is absent, this is a very important job however because the fourth part is the root of all chords and the whole harmony would be in dissaray without it. The other flautists might not accept it, but this little instrument is more important than you think!

A refugee from the "Sarvonian Percussion Instruments" entry. :D


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 02 September 2007, 06:25:44
Dear Bard,

 i have a Musical Notation entry in the works, and i was wondering if this would be a suitable format of your wonderful notation, because i cannot get strikethroughd to travel the desired length.

Here is a two part canon of Fere Jaques transposed into your notation as an example, this is the format i am using in my entry.


Ey____  Ba____  Je____  Ey____  Ba____  Je____  Ey____  Je____  Ur____  Os____
                                                                                     Ey____  Ba____  Je____

Je____  Ur____  Os____  Os__  Goh__  Os__  Ur__  Je__  Ey____ Os__  Goh__   
Ey____  Ba____  Je____  Je____  Ur____  Os____  Je____  Ur____ Os____

Os __  Ur__  Je__  Ey____  Ey____  Os>__  Ey____  Ey____  Os>__  Ey______
Os__  Goh__  Os__  Ur__  Je__  Ey____  Os__  Goh__  Os__  Ur__  Je__  Ey____

Ey____  Os>__  Ey____  Ey____  Os>__  Ey______

>equals down a pantheon, please comment me or PM me with your thoughts.


Thank you very much for your time, my busy Bard!! :heart: :grin:



Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Bard Judith on 02 September 2007, 10:09:19
Without checking the whole song (cos I don't have my notation memorized any more than I have the whole ThergerimTaal dictionary in my head!) I think the only error is that you haven't repeated the first 'Doh' or 'Ey' at the beginning of the second phrase.

Ey____  Ba____  Je____  Ey____  Ba____  Je____  Ey____  should read

Ey____  Ba____  Je____  Ey____ ,    Ey____ Ba____  Je____  Ey____  ... to match up with

"Frer   -   eh  -      Jah -  kuh        ,     Frer    -  eh  -     Jah -      kuh ..." 

The rest looks good!   I'm not sure about notating up and down pantheons with < and > - I think I chose to use numbers, but have a look at the entry and its comments again, as everything STILL hasn't been integrated (blushes)...


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 02 September 2007, 18:52:11
Thanks Judy! :heart:

So a rest equals a comma then? the longer the rest the more commas?
and if numbering the pantheon, would deep be 1 or would true be 1?

Thanks muchly again bard!!!! :grin: :hug:


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Bard Judith on 30 November 2007, 08:17:24
Bringing up to top again so this does not drown in the Misc. Forum.

We really need to make this a sticky so it can be added to like a Team Project.  Possible, dear Sage?


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 30 November 2007, 15:55:15
Ok, got it stickied now :)


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Petros Greenvale on 14 December 2007, 19:44:57
I know you want to keep it simple, but here are my ideas on how we could develop the scales of the santharian Pantheon:

*******

The Santharian pantheon is made up of twelve notes (The Pantheonic Palette), each of these notes has its own corresponding scale, where it resides as the foundation note (root note). These Scales are called the Chromatic Gamuts (or Gams for short)

Each Gamut uses a different combination of the twelve notes of the Pantheonic Palette when building the scale. Every note will have a possibility of four Gamuts where it is the foundation. The are the Joyful, Woeful, Angry and Giddy Gamuts. The Joyful Gamut is considered to be the original Gamut, and it is warped ever so slightly to change the mood. For instance, here are the Gamuts for Ba...

Joyful (Original):

Ba--Je--Eh--Os--Goh--Que--Neh--Ba

Woeful:

Ba--Je--Ur--Os--Goh--Fo--Neh--Ba

Angry:

Ba--Je--Ur--Os--Goh--Que--Ey--Ba

Giddy:

Ba--Je--Eh--Os--Goh--Que--Ey--Ba

(Note how the Gamot always begins an ends with the foundation)
(Ey is the only foundation that will have no angry Gamut, for Eyasha is ever peaceful)

When A musical piece is wanted to be played in a particular Gamut, the composer will put the enitials for the foundation note at the very beggining of the score, and put the following symbols to state whether it is the Joyful,Woeful,Angry or Giddy Gamuts:

Joyfull: OoO

Woefull: IiI

Angry: ^

Giddy: ~


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Just a few wee ideas....Please add to them yall....well if you want a semi-complicated pantheon that is! XD

By the way the Joyfull and Woeful are the same as the major and minor scales, the angry is its mode, but the giddy is the major scale with the 7th moved down a semitone.



Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Nsikigan Ho´Tonanese Yourth on 29 May 2008, 21:10:31
The notation thread, referenced in the Shoutbox, for your viewing pleasure.


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Ta`lia of the Seven Jewels on 11 July 2008, 15:33:40
A reminder: More work for Judy   :buck:

And as I saw Petros and Gean around, this might be a good time for bringing it forward


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Maggie O'Shannachan on 09 February 2009, 05:37:56
Would love to lend a hand on anything here if needed!
Would be nice to see it up and running in time! :)


Title: Re: Music of the Santharian Kingdom - New Entry under Development
Post by: Sparkle on 11 August 2010, 20:02:59
Aaah... Brownies can't play big instruments! They need smaller ones.

Suggestion:
Ihrroh – a brownie wind instrument shaped like a bag with two closed, rounded, pipes protruding from the bottom and one open pipe from the top. Sound is produced by blowing into the top pipe and notes are produced by adjusting wooden or bone membranes within the bag through the pulling of loops on the outside. The sound is reminiscent of birdsong.

Edit: They are small.