Santharian Development

Santharian World Development => The Santharian Herbarium => Topic started by: Órril Suarhán on 26 April 2008, 01:06:58



Title: Wanderworth
Post by: Órril Suarhán on 26 April 2008, 01:06:58
Categorization

Medicinal Herbs, Healing Herbs

Basic Overview of the Plant

The Wanderworth (also known as Wanderweed, Helvíl’merín or Tavor’s Chase) is a quite intriguing flower. Never growing more than a palmspan in height, the stem and roots of the plant is completely black and the plant gains its beauty from its flower which comes in many colors. The Wanderworth is best known for three things: its short lifespan, its amazing beauty and the myth of Tavor the Wanderer. Because of the short lifespan of the Wanderworth, seeing one or many in full bloom is considered a sign of good luck while a field of wanderworth stems is often thought to be an omen of bad things to come.

Description

Even with the immense variety of Wanderworth plants in Sarvonia the stem and roots of the plant are always black without exception. There are no thorns or hairs on the stem and its width varies depending on what type of Wanderworth you‘re looking at, but it is most commonly never wider than a grain or two. The flower of the Wanderworth comes in as many colors as there are places and a field of them is a thing of beauty, yet it pales in comparison to the sight of the Wanderworth petals soaring on the wind. While multi-colored blooms are not uncommon, the color of a Wanderworth usually stays consistent from generation to generation, but it is still not uncommon for a white Wanderworth petal to grow into a brilliant Uderza Blue or any other color. There has never been sighted such a thing as a black Wanderworth flower outside the arid regions of the Norong'Sorno volcano and even that is very rare.

The spacing and size of the petals of a Wanderworth flower varies primarily by type. From the wide, open bloom of the Ráhaz-Dáth Wanderworth or the more common cup-shaped flower in most of Sarvonia to the small, tightly closed flower of the Icelands, the Wanderworth is extremely hardy and able to adapt very quickly to its environment due to the short time between generations. The scent of the Wanderworth is a very pleasant thing, rising from the flower, it brushes the senses gently before it is gone, leaving only a fleeting memory.

There have been several documented variants of Wanderworth, with the Ráhaz-Dáth Wanderworth deviating furthest away from the more common Wanderworth types by having two wide, black leaves on either side of the stem to aid the plant in creating the nutrition it needs to survive by using sunlight. Originally researchers were baffled by how the plant could survive in such an arid place until it was shown that the Ráhaz-Dáth Wanderworth wilts away and dies when deprived of sunlight for more than one night. This shows that not only can the Ráhaz-Dáth Wanderworth survive in the ever-shifting sands of the desert, but they can live on absolutely no water at all by getting their energy from the sun, unlike the type of Wanderworth that lives in the colder, more snowy climates that can live without very little sunlight and survives on the water it picks up from the snow.

Territory


The Wanderworth is not really bound to any specific territory in Sarvonia but it is non-existent on the other continents. It can grow nearly anywhere with the only limitation being that it cannot reach places where the wind cannot carry it. The plant is extremely hardy and able to adapt to difficult situations in the span of only a single generation, though it will never grow indoors.

Usages

Wanderworth has several medicinal uses both beneficial and poisonous. After the flower of the Wanderworth breaks apart and leaves, the stalk dies soon after and becomes very dry and fragile. When crushed into powder, a dose under one-tenth of a mut acts as a powerful sedative, inducing heavy drowsiness and deep sleep in minutes. A dose larger than that is fatal and induces severe pain through the entire body for twenty-four hours before the victim goes into a deep sleep. Death soon follows with the record of survival without any sort of antidote or medicine to reduce the effect being three days of sleep. Waterstar leaves are the only known cure for the poison so far, but Arv seeds have shown an ability to prolong the life of the victim for a day or two depending on the size of the dose. If one is unlucky enough to be poisoned by the rare black Wanderworth, death is inevitable and no antidote has been found despite extensive research. The only way to discover when you are being given too large a dose is when your drink smells faintly of Wanderworth. Safe doses carry no noticeable scent.

The flower of the Wanderworth is quite the opposite of the stalk. When juiced, the petals serve as a powerful stimulant and anesthetic, relieving much pain and inducing restlessness and greatly alleviating fatigue. People who drink Wanderworth juice have often described the effect as being “like waking up after a good night’s sleep, fresh and full of energy as if you had just dunked your head into a bucket of ice cold water.” The juice also accelerates healing somewhat and along with its anesthetic effects this makes it rather popular among healers throughout Sarvonia and also among soldiers who are enduring long battles. When dried and burned, Wanderworth loses much of its potency as a stimulant, but becomes a quite potent aphrodisiac.

Reproduction

Wanderworth reproduction is quite difficult to research, seeing that its seeds seem to grow alongside the plant. The seeds are very small, flat and thin, are attached to the base of the petals and are usually the same color as the flower. When the plant dies, which is usually one or two weeks after reaching full maturity which takes only a day or two, the petals, which are exceptionally light, break away from the stem and are carried away on the wind. When the petals land, it only takes minutes for the seed to root itself and start growing using the original petal as a food source until it can begin to absorb nutrients from the ground or, in some cases like the Ráhaz-Dáth flower, from the sun.

The amount of seeds (and therefore petals) really depends on where you are. In normal climates the Wanderworth only carries four or five, while the Ráhaz-Dáth Wanderworth can have up to ten petals to ensure that enough seeds can find a place to grow before shriveling in the harsh desert sun. The third variant of Wanderworth, which grows primarily in the Icelands and in other cold places of Sarvonia such as the lower Tandalan Mountains, usually has a quite short stem only a few nailsbreadths long and three petals wrapped in a small, tight bud.

Myth/Lore/Origins (optional)

Possibly the best known myth that is connected to the Wanderworth is the legend of Tavor the Wanderer. According to the legend, Tavor was a well-known explorer who ventured into the Celeste Mountains and stole an object of great value to a Fire Dragon. The great beast was horribly angered and chased Tavor who, after he thought he had lost the dragon, sold the object for a great deal of money. When the dragon heard that the object had been subsequently melted down, it hunted Tavor for an entire year before it finally caught up with him high in the mountains of the Tandala Highlands. Both of them were tired of the long game of hide-and-seek and faced off in single combat. Unfortunately, neither of them survived. After the death of Tavor, people say that Avá took pity on the great explorer and turned his dying body into a flower that would fly free on the wind, unbound by the limitations of climate or territory. When he saw this, Coór was jealous of such freedom being granted to a being and so he took the dying dragon and bound it to become part of the flower and tie it down to the earth even if it was only for a short time. And so Tavor is free to fly on the wind to places known and unknown and yet the dragon chains him to the ground each time he pauses for a moment's rest.


Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Drúadan on 26 April 2008, 05:20:41
Hello Orril! Decided to take a look at your first entry, and a most interesting plant it is. I know how long it seems you wait for comments when you are trying this for the first time, so i've decided to take pity on you and offer some things up. ;)
First Off, I woud like to say this is one of the best first entry attempts I have seen. Far better than mine, and a decent example of how santharian cross-referencing should be done. I've tried to supplement your good ideas with some grammer checks and a few suggestions. I think I caught some of the main things, though if I missed something about the seeds (see comment) feel free to tell me. The main thing you need to check is my comment in the territory section, which you might be poked later for if not corrected.

Good luck and welcome to Santharia!



Categorization

Medicinal Herbs, Healing Herbs

Basic Overview of the Plant

The Wanderworth (also known as Wanderweed, Helvíl’merín or Tavor’s Chase) is a quite intriguing flower. Never growing more than a palmspan in height, the stem and roots of the plant is completely black with the only splash of color being the petals of the flower which can come in many colors The “which come in many colors” part reads sort’ve awkward to me. Perhaps separate these sentences or find another way of wording this?. The Wanderworth is best known for three things: its short lifespan, its amazing beauty and the myth of Tavor the Wanderer. Because of the short lifespan of the Wanderworth, seeing one or many in full bloom is considered a sign of good luck while a field of Wanderworth stems is often thought to be an omen of bad things to come.

Description

Even with the immense variety of Wanderworth plants in Sarvonia the stem and roots of the plant are always black without exception. There are no thorns or hairs on the stem and its width varies depending on what type of Wanderworth you‘re looking at, but it is most commonly never wider than a grain or two. The flower of the Wanderworth comes in as many colors as there are places and a field of them is a thing of beauty but it pales in comparison to the sight of the Wanderworth petals soaring on the wind. No commas or pauses of any kind in that sentence?! Definitely a run on. While multi-colored blooms are not uncommon, the color of a Wanderworth usually stays consistent from generation to generation, but it is still not uncommon for a white Wanderworth petal to grow into a brilliant Uderza Blue or any other color, but there has never been sighted such a thing as a black Wanderworth flower outside the Ráhaz-Dáth desert and even that is very rare.  The descriptions you are writing are very good content-wise, but I suspect that you had so much you wanted to say, that you started to develop some odd sentences. In the last one for example, you use “, but” as a transition twice. I could understand what you wanted to say, but maybe you need to split your thoughts into clearer fragments? I believe would really help your writing.

The spacing and size of the petals of a Wanderworth flower varies primarily by type. From the wide, open bloom of the Ráhaz-Dáth Wanderworth to the small, tightly closed flower of the Icelands, the Wanderworth is extremely hardy and able to adapt very quickly to its environment due to the short time between generations. The scent of the Wanderworth is a very pleasant thing, rising from the flower, it brushes the senses gently before it is gone, leaving only a fleeting memory. Love this touch!

There have been several documented variants of Wanderworth, with the Ráhaz-Dáth Wanderworth deviating furthest away from the more common Wanderworth types by having two wide, black leaves on either side of the stem to aid the plant in generating the nutrition it needs to survive by using sunlight. Need Mira or Judith’s opinion on this last sentence. Might be borderline to scientific, though you did a decent job of keeping it simple. I’m only concerned about the word “generating” and how we would know the black leaves help in drawing sunlight.

Territory

The Wanderworth is not really bound to any specific territory and can grow nearly anywhere with the only limitation being that it cannot reach places where the wind cannot carry it. The plant is extremely hardy and able to adapt to difficult situations in the span of only a single generation, though it will never grow indoors.  This is considered to be cheating in some ways. Most, if not all plants on our Earth are not found everywhere. The same is true in Caelereth. Try to find a couple places; Sarvonia, Nybelmar, wherever, and explain how the plant can exist there. A more acute location is always better than broad one.

Usages

Wanderworth has several medicinal uses, both beneficial and poisonous. After the flower of the Wanderworth breaks apart and leaves, the stalk dies soon after and becomes very dry and fragile. When crushed into powder, a dose under one-tenth of a mut acts as a powerful sedative, inducing heavy drowsiness and deep sleep in minutes. A dose larger than that is fatal and induces severe pain through the entire body for twenty-four hours before the victim goes into a deep sleep. Death soon follows with the record of survival without any sort of antidote or medicine to reduce the effect being three days of sleep. Waterstar leaves are the only known cure for the poison so far, but Arv seeds have shown an ability to prolong the life of the victim for a day or two depending on the size of the dose. If one is unlucky enough to be poisoned by the rare black Wanderworth, death is inevitable and no antidote has been found despite extensive research. The only way to discover when you are being given too large a dose is when your drink smells faintly of Wanderworth. Safe doses carry no noticable scent.

The flower of the Wanderworth is quite the opposite of the stalk. When juiced, the petals serve as a powerful stimulant and anesthetic, relieving much pain and inducing restlessness and greatly alleviating fatigue. People who drink Wanderworth juice have often described the effect as being “like waking up after a good night’s sleep, fresh and full of energy as if you had just dunked your head into a bucket of ice cold water.” The juice also accelerates healing somewhat and along with its anesthetic effects this makes it rather popular among healers throughout Sarvonia and also among soldiers who are enduring long battles. When dried and burned, Wanderworth loses much of its potency as a stimulant, but becomes a quite potent aphrodisiac.  Interesting… never had this one before…

Reproduction

Wanderworth reproduction is quite difficult to research, seeing that its seeds seem to grow alongside the plant. The seeds are very small and thin and are attached to the base of the petals. When the plant dies, which is usually one or two weeks after reaching full maturity which takes only a day or two, the petals, which are exceptionally light, break away from the stem and are carried away on the wind. When the petals land, it only takes minutes for the seed to root itself and start growing using the original petal as a food source until it can begin to absorb nutrients from the ground or, in some cases like the Ráhaz-Dáth flower, from the sun.  Either explain this in the description section, here, or a combination. How many seeds, what do they look like, etc. Did I miss this maybe? Feel like I did.

Myth/Lore/Origins (optional)

Possibly the best known myth that is connected to the Wanderworth is the legend of Tavor the Wanderer. According to the legend, Tavor was a well-known explorer who ventured into the Celeste Mountains and stole an object of great value to a Fire Dragon. The great beast was horribly angered and chased Tavor who, after he thought he had lost the dragon, sold the object for a great deal of money. When the dragon heard that the object had been subsequently melted down, it hunted Tavor for an entire year before it finally caught up with him high in the mountains of the Tandala Highlands. Both of them were tired of the long game of hide-and-seek and faced off in single combat. Unfortunately, neither of them survived, but it is said that their bodies turned into flowers, spawning the first generation of Wanderworth. It is believed that the Wanderworth symbolizes how the dragon dragon still hunts Tavor, who must be constantly on the move and can only stop for a short time before running again.


Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Órril Suarhán on 26 April 2008, 06:00:15
Thank you for your comments and your kind words, Drúadan.

I've integrated your suggestions in yellow.

I've done my best to clarify and correct any mistakes I made, but I can't seem to find a way to dumb down how the Wanderworth survives in the Ráhaz-Dáth desert (which is, if you haven't guessed by now, photosynthesis), but I've done my best. As for the territory, I meant to say that it grows throughout Sarvonia, but somehow it must have slipped my mind when I was writing it.


Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Drúadan on 26 April 2008, 06:10:18
Well, at a glance those changes look good. :) Thanks for taking my comments so quickly!

And by the way, dont bother typing (or copying) Druadan, just feel free to call me Dru. As you may have noticed, every here takes a nickname pretty quick. Your name happens to have a convient space, and we get Orril. ;)

Two more things that have just come to mind. If you are going to have specific santharian variants besides the Rahaz-Dath one, you need to might want to elaborate on the description. Not necessary and not super detailed, just an outline.

Also, consider telling us how much water this needs. In the rahaz-dath, you wil lbe hard pressed to find water in all but in hidden Oasis and other specific areas. If you need a lot, make sure you say these grow only near water sources in the desert. Perhaps there are certain animals in the area that could rely on the plant for munchies? Just some food (pun intended) for thought.


Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Órril Suarhán on 26 April 2008, 06:41:21
I've implemented your further suggestions in red, Drú.

I've described the third of the more common variants of Wanderworth, the one that lives in the snowier climates and explained how much water the Ráhaz-Dáth Wanderworth needs.

As for the Wanderworth being food, I can't really see that happening, seeing that eating the plant would result in the stalk dying and releasing its poison. Is there any herbivore in the Ráhaz-Dáth that can resist poison?


Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Drúadan on 26 April 2008, 07:39:01
New Revisions look good. :thumbup:

In terms of a poison resistant creature... there is non that I no of and have run a search, but if you really want help with how this will interact with the Rahaz-Dath, you need to connect Talia. You might try her bell-ringing thread, or just give it a day to see if she notices this.

EDIT: Obviously I am too slow, because she is looking at it now. ;)


Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Ta`lia of the Seven Jewels on 26 April 2008, 07:43:15
Hey Orril, that is a nice entry, especially for a first one, though Ihad just a quick look through.

There are two things I would like to ask you.

Could you please restrict the territory of the flower (the black leaves variety) to the arid regions of the Norong'Sorno and the few smaller volcanos to the north? That would make more sense, for this mountain is black and will have blacj drakes, black giant bats and so on. It can stil have the name, jyou just have to alter the part with the sands..

Second: Your myth is not very convincing. You don't say why the man and the dragon became the flower. Or I don't understand why it symbolises that the dragon still hunts the man who has to run or hide... 



Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Ta`lia of the Seven Jewels on 26 April 2008, 07:44:48
Dru   :rolling:

Thanks for thinking at informing me !


Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Órril Suarhán on 26 April 2008, 08:00:02
With my limited knowledge of the Santharian pantheon I did the best I could to make the myth more believable and more Santharian. Edits are in teal.


Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Finnael on 29 April 2008, 19:48:55
Two things I briefly caught grammatically:

...ventured into the Celeste Mountains and stole an object of great value to a Fire Dragon.
This sounds a little odd to me. Maybe "...stole an object that was of great value to a Fire Dragon."

When the plant dies, which is usually one or two weeks after reaching full maturity which takes only a day or two, the petals, which are exceptionally light, break away from the stem and are carried away on the wind.
Redundancy issues and possible run-on.
"Upon the death of the plant after one to two weeks from full maturity (which itself only takes 1 or 2 days), its exceptionally light petals break away from the stem and are carried away on the wind."
I think my correction here may need some grammatical help as well. But it still should provide you with some help.

I'll take a look more closely at the content a little later.


Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Miraran Tehuriden on 06 May 2008, 04:37:40
Matters that must be adressed to finish this entry;

-Both points mentioned by Finnael in the bost above.

-
Quote
Wanderworth is best known for three things: its short lifespan, its amazing beauty and the myth of
It cannot be best known for three things.. suggest changing to "....is well known for...."

-
Quote
a field of wanderworth stems is often thought to be an omen of bad things to come.
Why?

-
Quote
the Wanderworth is extremely hardy and able to adapt very quickly to its environment due to the short time between generations.
Species do not evolve on Caelereth.

-
Quote
when deprived of sunlight for more than one night
You mean the sun shines at night in the Rahaz-Dath? Ava, you never cease to amaze me!

-
Quote
When juiced, the petals serve as a powerful stimulant and anesthetic
Personally, i would place the anesthetic capabilities with the sleep powder, as anasthesia and stimulation would cancel each-other out.


A very innovative idea!



Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Drúadan on 06 May 2008, 05:36:27
Quote
Quote
Quote
when deprived of sunlight for more than one night
You mean the sun shines at night in the Rahaz-Dath? Ava, you never cease to amaze me!

Wouldn't that be the reason for the judicious and careful placement of the word "more" Mira? One night is fine I assume... it's just more than one that's a problem.  ;)

That's All. Besides the other things mentioned, looks lovely. :)


Title: Re: Wanderworth
Post by: Miraran Tehuriden on 06 May 2008, 06:03:40
But i was planning on depriving it every night!