Santharian Development

Santharian World Development => Languages and Runes => Topic started by: Artimidor Federkiel on 17 August 2005, 13:36:00



Title: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 17 August 2005, 13:36:00
This is the place where you should put new proverbs, sayings, curses etc. you create. Just state the proverb/saying, add to it the meaning/explanation and finally the race where it is used and if applicable the tribe to which you can allocate it.

Example (ideal post):

Proverb/Saying: "Did you hear Dalireen's bells?"
Meaning/Explanation: Used when a person has something of an epiphany, when the complications of a problem become clear. In a sense, the person is asking if Dalireen's bells have helped them find the answer in the same way her bells are said to help lost children. Often used among neighboring humans tribe and among hobbit folk.
Origin: Hobbit (Helmond)

From time to time this thread will be emptied and its contents will be moved on the site.


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 17 February 2007, 03:53:43
Unflattering “nicknames” for those who have these ear-slits (Avennorians), as mentioned in Grunok's Marduran entry:

“slit-ear”, highly offensive names are “gill-face”, “fish-man”, or “redfish”

While there are no derogatory sayings about these people, there is a saying which is often used to explain the ear-flap peculiarity to those from other parts of Caelereth before they rashly offend a person with this characteristic. It goes: “Big slits – big lungs – big house – big pouch”. This attempts to illustrate that having ear-slits means that they can dive for a long time and this, along with the high probability of connections to the nobility (or a noble "house", as it states in the saying), means they are rich, and therefore powerful people.

Many thanks go to Grun!  :thumbup:


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin on 14 July 2007, 16:27:39
“Lonely as a wison mount”, to refer to a man (sometimes a woman though less frequently) who has lost their spouse and never remarries.  This is in reference to the fact that Wison mounts who lose a rider are rarely able to be trained to take another.  Ice Tribe in origin.


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 21 July 2007, 03:43:13
From the Liu’lian entry:

Quote
A common saying is "a Liu’lian has eyes and can see where it is falling". This is because (so the saying goes) the fruit never falls during daylight hours when people may be hurt by their size, vicious spines and the velocity gathered as they hurtle to the ground, but rather in the hours when honest citizens certainly would not be prowling under Liu’lian Trees.


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Alysse the Likely on 14 August 2007, 00:52:36
Two saying about the Riccio, or pricklypig.


Hobbit saying:

"Don't bump bottoms with a porkprickle!"  Said when someone is attempting an impossible or recklessly dangerous feat.


Kuglimz saying:

"Curi'sar'mystrum'ang" (lit. "arrow pig (Riccio) battle not")  ie. Don't fight the prickly pig.   Said when someone is attempting an impossible or recklessly dangerous feat.



Alysse the Likely


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Gwai'ayia Quillouf on 26 August 2007, 11:34:46
"To love as Arleina' loves."
Elvish

Or

"To love a shadow."
Human

"To love ice when it sits in the desert sun."
Human

Said by a lover when the object of the desire does not return their love, or when the object of love is unreachable by some barrior (by rank, wealth, or any separation that may divide lovers).

For example:

"To love her would be to love a shadow."

Or it is impossible to love her.

The human phrases apply that such impossible love is often fleatingly loved by the lover.  That a suiter will soon forget a love that they cannot have.

The elven phrase, however, implies that such love is enternal, hopeless, sad, and deseparate.  It should be noted that this phrase was coined by a group of elves upon obversing the death of two human lovers leaping off a cliff in order to be together in death when they could not be togther in life.  It is also perhaps said with some derision and is often said when obversing two human lovers since the Elves know no love themselves.


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Thortar on 05 September 2007, 20:13:48
Yeah here are some from my entry.

Saying:“It’s/Their sticking like Nightgrape”
Meaning/Use: Used when something or someone is sticking to the person and refuseing to leave.
Origin: Dwafs use it the most because they grow the grape and it is very hard to get of the rock once on it.

Saying:“Gossip grows like the Nightgrape but is far less useful”.
Meaning/Use:Well it's pretty self explanitry, used when something happens and is quick to travel.
Origin: Againn dwarfs because the nightgrape grows so quickly.


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Bard Judith on 19 October 2007, 12:20:28
Tanco, while your 'saying' is accurate, it's not particularly novel, and more importantly, not particularly Santharian.  If you are role-playing, you can use this expression, certainly, but nothing about it warrants inclusion in the compendium - or even extra explanation beyond the phrase itself. 

Not to be snide, but as it happens I have a phrase to post:  perhaps you can see the difference?  :)

----------------------------------------------------------------

'Worth putting through a Mercato-net..."

"Let's use Mercnet on this...."

Both expressions are popular with human tribes wherever the Mercato, a small bloodsucking fly, is found, and wherever the finely-meshed fabric known as 'Mercato-net' or 'Mercnet' is sold.    The first refers to taking the time to check something thoroughly or inspecting it closely (as in Terra we might say 'with a fine-tooth comb').  The second is similar, meaning 'let's use discernment' or 'judge very carefully'.


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 26 January 2008, 00:39:27
From Grun's religion entry - extracted here so that it is not forgotten:

Quote
Many commentators have noticed a certain happy ‘fatalism’ expressed by Serphelorians; some sour individuals have gone as far as calling them “oblivious to reality”! Whether it is a good thing or not, Serphelorians do show a remarkable sense that everything will turn out for the best. Phrases like “Seyella’s plan is hidden”, “Troubles lead to treasures”, or the ambiguous, seldom finished “Lose your sword-hand…”[1] illustrate this philosophy in day-to-day life in Sanguia and its surrounds. This confident attitude allows them to remain more or less carefree in situations that would upset or sadden most members of other tribes, and to be as open and friendly as their reputation tells.

(*) [1] This phrase, while the original ending seems to be lost, is sometimes finished in a novel way, to amusing effect. The endings always run along the lines of "gain a (something)" where the ‘something’ usually appeals to the ribald Serphelorian sense of humour. One example, heard in the Santhran’s Shield tavern in Vreesran went "Lose a sword-hand, gain a stable-hand", which may not seem particularly provocative without the accompanying winks and loud laughter – therefore making this particular version printable.


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Eoranna Melor on 11 February 2008, 15:42:06
origin: Eophyrhim

Saying: "He is nearing his hour of waking."

Meaning:  As the Eophyrhim believe death is the only release from the dream of life, the saying means that the indicated person is about to die.

Saying: to "give the gift of waking"

Meaning: to kill someone. Death is a gift to those weaker than one's self.

Saying: to be "covered with/lack moss"

Meaning: to be well/less respected.  Those with high standing have houses covered with tree rot.

Saying: to be "pierced in the face"

Meaning: to be disgraced or outcast

Saying: to "have a shaved scalp"

Meaning: to be young, rash, and inexperienced.  Younger drow often shave their hair to appear frightening in battle.


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 20 April 2008, 15:27:56
From the Parpalm entry:

On R’unor they use the expressions “False as a Parfruit” – meaning, of course, that appearances are deceiving – and also “Pretty as a Parfruit” – never used to locals, but to outsiders ironically.

Barkath Islanders say “I’m parpalmin’ busy…” This expression is sighed in exasperation when one has too many projects on the go at one time, a nod to the usefulness of the tree.

-------------

"as loyal as a Caladrius"


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Rookie Brownbark on 29 April 2008, 00:34:43
Proverb/Saying: "Where river and rock run closest, there the water is liveliest"
Meaning/Explanation: Referring to the fact that differences in opinion, talent or culture often spark the best ideas.  It is often used when trying to encourage a reluctant group to work together, although it's origins date  to ancient times and the beginnings of the Llaoihrr settlement.  It was first used to encourage different coloured Brownies to work as a whole, rather than fighting each other for power as they had during the Birni Era.
Origin: Brownie (Llaoihrr, although not unheard of in Milkengrad either)


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Tharoc Wargrider on 02 May 2008, 02:30:47
 
SAYING
"Don't kick a Warg up the backside while he has your hand in his mouth."

MEANING
When things are going bad for you, try not to make them worse.

ORIGIN
Traditional Ashz-oc proverb


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Fox on 12 May 2008, 15:33:51
Saying: "Aaahhhmmm... aaahhhmmm...." (spoken slow and deeply, as if one were meditating)

Meaning: Ximaxian saying to help mage students remember that Ahm Xeuá links in a Cár’áll are passive. The saying relates the word's spelling and pronunciation with an over-exaggerated meditation trance, implying tranquility.

Origin: Human (Ximaxian)


Saying: "To soar is to Soór."

Meaning: Ximaxian saying to help mage students remember that Soór Xeuá links in a Cár’áll are active. The saying relates the word's spelling and pronunciation with soaring, implying active flight.

Origin: Human (Ximaxian)



((I've actually been using these two proverbs for years now and it's what has always helped me remember which is which. ;)))


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 12 July 2008, 15:45:02
From the Foilfish/Red Herring entry:

The saying "To see a Red Herring", popular among the fishermen of the Northern Bay, means that someone is seeing things that are not really there. It would be the author's guess that it is most commonly used in a version of "Last night I drank so much, I was seeing Red Herring!", considering the origins of this saying.

"Common as Foilfish" is another saying related to these animals found primarily in the city-states that govern the southern beaches of the Northern Bay, and of course refers to the vast number of these fish in a shoal.


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 12 July 2008, 16:50:54
From the Yepran entry:

The Yepran, like most other toads, is four legged and has very muscular hind legs for hopping through the rainforests. Such hugely powerful legs are quite a necessity for the Yepran, since its large mass requires a considerable amount of force for it to be shifted. The beast’s limbs are so large that they seem too bulky, even for a creature of this magnitude, giving them a (to some) comical appearance. This characteristic led to the phrase "…like Yepran legs" which entailed something was in greater quantities than required, perhaps conveying greed, gluttony or riches i.e. "He has gold like Yepran legs".


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Artimidor Federkiel on 03 August 2008, 20:50:52
From Jud'y Lopstere entry:

Sayings: "As slow as a lob on land", "Cross as two Cobsters in springtime" "Lopstere-lover" (for a person behaving in a manner perceived above their class, meaning stuck-up, hoity-toity).


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Garret Arroway on 10 August 2008, 14:20:28
Proverb/Saying: "He's got no more dreams than a Kyranian, only lookin' to <insert occupation here> (ex. 'plow the fields') for the rest of his life."
Meaning/Explanation: Said by one adult to another about a child that doesn't have the common childish fantasies about riding winged horses, battling beasts, and/or taming dragons like the heroes in bedtime stories.
Origins: Human, Southern Sarvonian

Proverb/Saying: "As pretty as a Kyranian."
Meaning/Explanation: Most commonly directed to a young male who makes his friends wait while he works toward looking his best before heading to the local tavern for the night. It is also used sarcastically by a man or woman to point out someone who is ugly. The second way is sometimes used as a joke among male/female friends.
Origins: Human, Southern Sarvonian

Proverb/Saying: "You been standin' behind them Longhorns (horses or other cattle as well) again?" or "Run along now and don't go standin' behind no Longhorns yaself now boy/girl."
Meaning/Explanation: The first is said to a youth that has a sprinkling of freckles across the bridge of their nose, mostly said by fathers, uncles, and/or grandfathers of the child. The second is used by elders that catch another youth messing with a boy/girl about their freckles.
Origins: Human, Kyranian


Title: Re: New Proverb and Sayings Additions
Post by: Tharoc Wargrider on 17 August 2008, 07:46:08

SAYING  "Yu'll get nowt fer nowt wi' an orc"

TRANSLATION  "You'll get nothing for nothing with an orc"

ORIGINATOR  Varek, Kaaer guide occasionally used by Azhira El'rosse

MEANING  Refers to the notoriously hard bargains driven by orcs in their trading, even with members of their own families.


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin on 11 January 2009, 00:40:08
SAYING  "Only a dead man sweats"

Meaning/Explanation: This saying is used as a warning to those who travel the frozen wastes.  As a matter of survival, one cannot let themselves get wet through exertion, or they will soon find themselves at risk of freezing when the exertion stops.

Origins: Human, Remusian


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Lorek Sarnif on 22 January 2009, 04:44:20
Saying: Do not crack whips at my warg!

Meaning: Do not anger me.

Origin: Navek Boneshredder, Rhom-Oc war general.


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Garret Arroway on 01 March 2009, 08:21:05
Sayin': "Never give an orc a cookie."

Meanin' / Explanation: You always seem to regret it as even the most civilized ones have a habit of talking with their mouth's full. Also meant to be a general warning given to someone who is prepared to do something they know they'll regret.

Origin: Researchers and Writers for the Santharian Compendium (or anyone who has met Tharoc)


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Coren FrozenZephyr on 01 March 2009, 20:03:36
Replace: whose > who has


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Miraran Tehuriden on 01 March 2009, 21:03:26
Mwahahahaha, oh, thank you for that one Garret! Thank you indeed! Aura point for aiming at Tharoc! :evil:


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Garret Arroway on 01 March 2009, 23:20:45
:grin: ... I've been told I'll be repayed for that one, but I couldn't pass it up when he walked right into it. I'll never look at Girl Scout cookies the same way from now on. Which is probably good cause I'm a huge pushover when it comes to little kids and they always manage to get me to buy a box each year. They set up camp outside the stores and I get trapped.  :buck:


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Miraran Tehuriden on 01 March 2009, 23:31:17
tee hee hee, im going to have a lot of fun from this one coming april :P


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Tharoc Wargrider on 03 March 2009, 05:06:21
Saying: An Orc carrying a grudge makes a dangerous house-guest.

Meaning: Exactly what it says on the tin

Source: ME!

@ Garrett:   Are you really sure you want to get into this?

@ Mira:  Lest ye forget, you shall be within arms reach, come April.


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Miés´efér Lytherá on 03 March 2009, 06:11:34
With the help of the neighborhood orc, I've come up with these ones. (It was more the other way around as you'll soon see)

Saying: "A Warg's getten it's claws in't heart o' that 'un"
Translation: "A Warg is getting it's claws into the heart of that one"
Meaning: An outside source, usually another person is using their influence to harden the heart of the subject
Source: Tharoc (Who else?)

Saying: "That 'uns gorra Warg's claws fer 'eart"
Translation: "That one has a Warg's claw for a heart."
Meaning: The subject is a cold or cruel person.
Source: Tharoc

Saying: "A Warg's claws' getten owd o' that 'uns 'eart"
Translation: "A Warg's claw is getting a hold of that one's heart"
Meaning: Something --whether it be lost love, or gained annomosity-- is driving the compasion out of the subject's heart.
Source: Tharoc


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: wesley on 25 March 2009, 15:30:24
Saying:Do not be an orc the elves shall spiketh you

Meaning: don't do bad thing or bad thing will happen to you kinda like Karma

Origin: Human


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: wesley on 25 March 2009, 15:35:20
Saying: Never strike a wizard if thou art sure he awake

Meaning: don't do something when you know its wrong

Origin: Human


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: wesley on 25 March 2009, 15:37:55
Saying: Never drink a Pint by the Well
Meaning: Don't get Drunk in a dangerous place
Origin: Hobbit


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Alysse the Likely on 27 May 2009, 06:02:12
Saying:  "A woman will make a good mother if she has breasts like the Celeste mountains and hips like a Kev’lor mare”.

Meaning: Obvious

Origin: Kuglimz


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Valan Nonesuch on 22 June 2009, 22:20:10
From the Yanth River entry to the long lists:

"so and so has a Razor’s bite he does"\

Meaning: Refers to the sharpness of an individuals words, particularly when refering to insults.

Origin: Ciosan


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Smee on 06 July 2009, 18:51:43
From the Simsy entry, regarding a story told about the pair of eagles that nest on the Sentinels above the village. The villagers refer to the eagles as 'the watchers' :

"The villagers use it to encourage young men and woman to seek each other out before they get too old with sayings like "We already have our Watchers, we don't need any more". Other sayings such as "The Watchers will tell me!" are used to discourage infidelity between couples, often heard from women seeking to warn their new husbands. Also "May the Watchers peck out my eyes" is often invoked to seal an important promise. "


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Fox on 02 September 2009, 04:37:50
(plant mentioned in Thalambath entry. Entry on plant itself still to be written)

Saying: "What a Firestar!"
Meaning: A beautiful and feisty woman. Depending on tone can be a compliment or an insult, as in "Well aren't you a little Firestar?".
Origin: Human (Stratanian)


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang on 25 September 2009, 08:42:40
Saying:  “If you hear the stones laughing, run for your life, for the ogres are surely on their way to catch you”.

Meaning: The saying expresses the superstition that ogres in the Rimmerins Ring employ magical stones as sentinels to alert them to the presence of intruders and prey in their territory. The stones are said to jump in the air and laugh when a person or large animal comes along. Research suggests, however, that the alleged laughing stones are in fact beetle-like non-magical creatures whose jumps are a means of escape from predators, and who are not in fact in the employment of the ogres (see Gigglepebbles (http://www.santharia.com/bestiary/gigglepebble.htm)).

Origin: Rimmerins Ring


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang on 01 November 2009, 22:08:19
From the Ugling entry:

Saying: She/He is chasing an ugling.

Meaning:  The ugling, a sea slug, is known to send feverish daydreams to travellers on the Adanian Sea. Some see these dreams as indications of their true wishes, and strive to realize their vision in real life. The saying reflects the popular opinion that it is not wise to do so.

“To chase an Ugling” means to strive for something that, once it is attained, will fail to satisfy. A man who woos a woman that he regards as a charming young beauty, although she is recognized as hollow-hearted and vain by everyone but himself; a lady of Marduran who wishes she could move to Ciosa, because she believes that the men are more gallant there; and a Ciosan who thinks that the sea is bluer when viewed from Marduran: all these are chasers of Uglings.

Origin: East coast of Manthria


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Rookie Brownbark on 03 December 2009, 06:28:18
Saying: to win or earn Brownie Points

Meaning: To do something clever which requires intelligence.  Usually used for an achievement where your brilliance has shone.

Origins:  This comes from the "Four Flowers Game (http://www.santharia.com/games/four_flowers_game.htm)", a board game requiring skill and intelligence which originated among the Milken Brownies of Milkengrad.  Brownies (and other races too) win tiny tokens called "points" off each other when they beat their opponent.  As this requires some tactical quick thinking, winning the points has become associated with other feats of intelligence too.


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Stormraven on 09 December 2009, 21:31:59
From the Cutlass entry

Saying- Cutlass Wearer

Meaning-"Cutlass Wearer" has become a bit of an insult in many trade circles. It means someone who is greedy and "goes for the gold", a trait that the many think the Avennorians share with pirates.

origin-Avennorians


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: wesley on 15 December 2009, 14:34:16
Saying:Go Sleep with an Orc
Meaning: Kind of like saying go to Hell
Origen: Humen


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: wesley on 15 December 2009, 14:51:13
If you sit on a Snake.... It will Bite your Sitter.
Meaning :don't make people mad
origen: Humen


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang on 01 June 2010, 01:20:29
Saying: “Ask the spider which of her legs made the web.”

Meaning: This is the customary reply that tapestry makers give a customer who asks which individual weaver is responsible for the overall design of the artwork. With their answer, the weavers wish to make clear that all their work is collaborative.

Origin: Fymbel Guild of Tapestry Weavers, Kingdom of Santharia


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang on 03 June 2010, 06:27:09
From the Hogling entry, three pig-related expressions:

1.

Expression: "Hogling's gift".

Meaning: A present given with the intention to charm a sweetheart (derived from the hoglings' mating ritual).

Origin: Hobbits.

2.

Saying: "Think like a hogling."

Meaning: If you don't know how else to woo your sweetheart, give her/him a present, be kind to her, etc.

Origin: Hobbits.


3.

Saying: "Stop shoving hogling hoards into her face".

Meaning: Give up, she's just not interested.

Origin: Chyrakisth Or..., erm, Hobbits.


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Valan Nonesuch on 04 June 2010, 01:29:39
Expression "Who lets the cold touch them will soon themselves find cold"

Meaning: Because the Touch of Death is concealed inside a glove it is popular for those wearing it to claim that they are cold to keep their gloves on. Allowing a person wearing such a weapon contact is a receipt for death. It is considered incredibly foolish to let someone wearing gloves touch you in R'unorian culture for precisely this reason.

Origin: R'unorian Isles


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Athviaro Shyu-eck-Silfayr on 20 June 2010, 04:56:20
Saying: When you reach close quarters you must draw your Shortsword

Meaning: You have to be able to adapt to the circumstances

Saying: You cannot always use your scourge

Meaning: You can't rely on a single tactic.

Origin: Both from the Tethinrhim elves

(Often used in conjunction with one another)


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin on 20 June 2010, 06:26:20
I wish Rayne were here more often.  Good sayings, but not really "elfy" in my ears.  I know Rayne was working hard to create a truly unique elf race, rather than a pointy eared human.  These sayings sound more human.

We really need a truly "elf" expert.  I miss you Rayne. :cry:  (though I'm quite sure she does not feel the same for me  :rolleyes:)


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Athviaro Shyu-eck-Silfayr on 28 September 2010, 22:48:31
Saying: To meet Meanra's hiveling

Meaning: Meanra's hiveling showed Ciosa to the site where he was to found the capital of Avennoria. Means that someone has found the answer. Can be used positively as in "You must have met Meanra's hiveling! Well done!" or negatively, to imply someone cheated or had help on something when they shouldn't have. Also just used to mean a flash of inspiration.

Origin: Avennorian


Title: Re: New Proverbs and Sayings Additions
Post by: Deklitch Hardin on 03 March 2011, 17:19:15
Proverb/Saying: "To light the darkreign candle"
Meaning/Explanation: Used when a person has to work on something through the night, popularised by the architects of Ximax. Darkreign is, according to the Santharian way of reckoning time, the darkest part of the Caelereth day, when Injera is somewhere on the other side of the disc, and the dark is in full reign. It is believed to have originated with the Centoraurian humans.
Origin: Human (Centoraurian)