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Author Topic: 'The Philosophy of the Ancient Tiquaitan'- An Essay  (Read 6222 times)
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Decipher Ziron
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« on: 23 November 2008, 22:06:38 »

The philosophical musings of the now extinct Tiquaitan men are regarded amongst the most profound and enlightening concepts discussed by any civilisation, modern or archaic. Most of what we know of the Tiquaitan men (and particularly of their famous philosophy and poetry) comes from archives of the Tarshiinite priesthood, much of the Old Republic’s wisdom being seized by them after the fall. Perhaps to give a better understanding of the nature of Tiquaitan philosophy, one of Decipher Ziron’s acquaintances within the Tarshiinite priesthood has managed to procure a copy of Monk Sasarta’s renowned essay summarising the works of the four classical greats of Tiquaitan philosophy.



FOREWORD

One should remember that while this essay seeks to discuss individual philosophers and their personal ideas, much of Tiquaitan philosophy naturally develops from the classical schools of thought. While they grew and changed in name and content over the centuries the main ideologies brought forward sprang from one of the three archetypes:

'The School of Order'- A philosophical idea that advocates the importance of rigidness in defining our purposes. A very clean cut dogma, students of Order were strong proponents of adhering to authority, regardless of the consequences. A fundamental aspect of Order would appear to be its enforcement onto others. The School of Order always preached that it was neccesary that things be made to stay the same way they are, change being a corrupting factor.

'The School of Chaos'- A further idea that acts as the opposite of Order. While not explicit advocates of violence or anarchy, Chaotic thinkers suppose that morality should stem from what we want and that we should persue at all costs. Proponents of chaos are also known for their progressive attitudes, believing in the fundamental principle that all things have change in their nature.

'The School of Nature'- Something of a bridge between the two schools. Naturalists draw their ideology from watching things naturally unfold. While Order seeks to enforce a stillness in morality and Chaos seeks to incite change, Nature is much more concerned with allowing things to develop by themselves and govern themselves by the principle that things unfold most effectively when left alone. Though many Naturalist thinkers were generalised as 'Esilatists' (see below), the ideology itself has a much greater sphere of influence.

These schools are further discussed by Sasarta in differing texts, and for greater depth they should be consulted




‘The Nature of Tiquaitan Thought- by Monk Sasarta

Though Tiquaitan philosophy is probably the broadest in its subject matter, interpretations and opinions in all of Nybelmar, the four classical greats of the Tiquaitan Republic (or rather ‘Kingdom’, since their writings took place before the uprising against the monarchy) give a relatively vivid image of the philosophical landscape of this ancient civilisation.



The Ambitious Mind: Aroonate Masmalama- 3700 b.s.-3580 b.s.

Aroonate (Ah-Roon-a-tay) Masmalama was categorised by his ‘asking of grand questions’, the focus of his work being the investigation into epic concepts such as reality and the validity of our existence. Aroonate’s work generally concerned itself it with fundamental matters of truth. Due to a lack of religion amongst the Tiquaitan men, there was no universally recognised idea on why we are here and what put us here in the first place. One of his most complex concepts was the idea of ‘Proving Reality’. Essentially, he argued that since reality is defined by what we perceive, and everyone perceives differently, the ‘truth’ behind ‘what reality is’ is ambiguous:

‘How do we define what is real? Truly what I see, what I feel, what I smell, hear and taste create my reality- constructing my environment through various recognisable pulses. This poses an issue. Surely, if ‘reality’ is defined by how I interpret the signals I experience, then the ‘reality’ experienced by someone else could be completely different (that is to say, a different interpretation). Ultimately, this means ‘reality’, a cornerstone of what we consider to be immovable truth, is in fact subject to constant, unregulated change. What at a first glance appears as adamant as rock is in fact as fluid as water’

Through further development of this concept, Aroonate proposed many possible implications. He stated that by (in his eyes) proving ‘truth’ is a concept of unspoken variability, ‘hallucinations’ which other do not see could simply be considered ‘realities’ that others did not experience. He even went, as far to say that our dreams produced temporary parameters of existence wherein the events were ‘real’, they simple just had no bearing on the general, core ‘reality’. He proposed, using these assumptions as outlines, that it was in fact possible that no one else actually existed and that you yourself are the only conscious being (everything else being a figment of your imagination [though passively]).

After researching the Sartheran Elves of the Northern Bay, Aroonate added to his thesis. His expansion was entitled 'Ava the Mortal'- wherein he labelled the Elven deity of Ava nothing more than any us. While She was revered by the elves as the Dreamer behind everything, Aroonate argued that we all had the capacity to invent our own realities, just that we are not conciously aware of our doing so. This sparked outrage amongst the Sartherans and as such Narsira the Green (the King at the time) ordered all copies be recalled.

The Moral Standard: Susashale Esiliate 3681 b.s.- 3560 b.s.

Often regarded as Aroonate’s primary opponent, Susashale (Soo-sa-shay-el) dedicated her philosophical musings to matters of morality. She was a zealous student of Naturalist ideas but later went on to combine her thoughts with the School of Order. Eventually, she came to the conclusion that morality itself springs from the preservation of nature, an idea eventually taken to extremes.

Her most audacious act was her rejection of Aroonate’s central focus- famously quoted to have said ‘It is inalienable that we, ourselves, do exist and as such challenging the fabric of something so obvious is a horrid waste of everyone’s time’. Susashale was much more interested in investigating how to define ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ in the broad scope of Tiquaitan society. Due to the Tiquaitan Kingdom’s lack of divine belief, there was little in terms of ‘organised conduct’ as can be seen in the Tarshiinites today. As a result, Susashale’s teachings caused great debate amongst her contemporaries, but with a lack of social convention to support their arguments, much of what she said could only be challenged on a personal level, in one’s own mind.

Susashale’s most controversial writing was titled ‘The Modern Age and our abuse of Death’- wherein she challenged the usage of highly advanced medicine to prolong life. Though this may seem a relatively minor claim, the importance laid by the Tiquaitan on medicine and ‘pursuing immortality’ was enormous, and by challenging this Susashale had knowingly attacked the fabric of the day’s society. As perhaps a display of her own influence, for long after her death ‘Esilatists’, as they were called, rejected all forms of medicine after being moved by Susashale’s writings- well aware of the fact that this would limit their lifespan considerably (in comparison to the other Tiquaitan of course).

In her most comprehensive writing, ‘A Basis for Self-government’, Susashale discussed ideas of morality that spread throughout most aspects of Tiquaitan life. The areas addressed varied extensively between cruelty to animals, attitudes to gluttony, the importance of appearance, the allure of vice and the danger of jealousy (amongst various other topics of discussion). As a result of her extensively developed thoughts about the intrinsic links between Nature and Order, she tied all of her moral advice into the sustaining of nature somehow. Though the broad teachings of this woman in this particular context were received remarkably well, modern critics highlight a strong arrogance in her work, Susashale writing as though above these moral pitfall’s herself- condescending elevating her to a position above the rest of society.

Nature's Thinker: Raretogaya Wahricora 3643 b.s.- 3543 b.s.

Presumed to be a student of Arooante at some point, Raretogaya (Rah-ray-too-gai-yah) was known as ‘Nature’s Thinker’ amongst the philosophers of the time. Raretogaya chose to investigate what he called ‘Patterns of Nature’, a focus which modern critics consider as a digression of Aroonate’s fundamental questioning of reality. Much of what Raretogaya discussed revolved around the idea that there was innate symbolism in the nature, which, should we find a way to decipher it, would provide us with an infinite knowledge and understanding.

In his sole publishing, ‘The Obvious Truth’, Raretogaya drew many parallels between the opposing arguments of Aroonate and Susashale. He sympathised heavily with Susashale’s ideas about ‘natural respect’ as well as using Aroonate’s somewhat vague musings about ‘the nature of truth’ to substantiate his own ideas. Raretogaya claimed that in every construct we could not control- from the shape of a tree’s branches to the alignment of the stars- was expressive of a 'Natural Course', a very abstract concept detailing one unifying force between all things we could perceive. (though he is explicit to state it is not a ‘God’ in anyway).

Much of Raretogaya’s work, however, would seem to be confounded by his personal beliefs. Raretogaya’s teachings were in no way objective and, unlike most philosophers, did not seek to explain one vital facet of life. Raretogaya was a zealous believer and advocate of Starspotting, Rootreading and Tiletelling ¹, and many of his contemporaries and practically the entirety of modern critics regarded/regard his philosophies as arguments to substantiate his superstitious beliefs as opposed to personal realisations of great truth. His importance as one of the 'Greats' could then be challenged. Many modern critics seek of the 'Great Three', neglecting Raretogaya, but many still see him as a pertinent reminder for philosophy. He is shown to be a man who's own beliefs caused his questions to be distorted. He is shown, by the sympathetic at least, as a reminder that philosopher stretches beyond perception but there must still remain an endearing quality to it.

The Critic: Korania Neemabil 3648 b.s.-3498 b.s.

Though Korania himself published two individual writings (concerning primarily the relevance of Kunijen [The Faith of the Tsohamin Barbarians] in a modern society and an analysis of how social factors skew the validity of religious faith), Korania is famed primarily for his skills as a critic. Being an eloquent and cynical young man, Korania took it upon himself to find at least one flaw in the work of his colleagues, and in many cases explode it to such a level that others would interpret perfectly valid arguments as nonsense. Korania is often revered as being the ‘quality control’ of Tiquaitan philosophy, since for something to be accepted into the mainstream, it needed to survive Korania’s meticulous examination.

As perhaps a testament to his talent, Korania was able to expand upon Aroonate's work after his death without any opposition. He investigated the idea of 'self-invented' reality, the idea that something passively creates everything around us. To quote his speech from the Greenbirth Terrace- 'If we are merely figments of the mind, illusions, dreams, than it is through ourselves we are able to unlock why we came to be. All of us dream, both of the fanciful and of the terrifying, and if we could understand why it is we are given these images of delight and fear we may understand thus why these things are 'dreamt' into the world around us'. His propositions, about the nature of dreaming, drew much interest from the Nybelmarian elven communities, much more so than Aroonate's vauge references to them in the past had done.

Due to his somewhat supercilious role in the philosophical world, Korania made himself many enemies, though his annoyingly fine-tuned ability to make insulting critique, which, despite offensive quality, was completely valid, was uncontested. He was held in such a high esteem that in the height of his career many aspiring young philosophers would seek out Korania to ‘proof-read’ their ideas before having them published.

 Korania, tragically, was disgraced and discredited after the publishing of his most famous work, ‘The Pointlessness of Our Philosophy’, wherein he referenced practically every respected philosophical concept and argued it was useless and had no bearing on anything in reality, essentially arguing that pursuing philosophical truth was an ineffectual waste of time. Though many of Korania’s statements were perfectly valid, the outrage caused by challenging the professions of so many dedicated individuals was more than enough for him to become a social pariah. It would seem to be the case that rather than acknowledge their life choices could have been fundamentally flawed, the philosophers of the time were much happier to scorn anyone who suggested it.

Overall Importance

It is important to understand the context of these writings. Even before the three kingdoms united ² the citizens that would make up the Tiquaitan had made the decision to reject the organised religion that was held as so fundamental to us ³ for such a long time. Without any such concrete teachings to use as foundations for morality or truth, philosophers with enough respect were capable of ascending to positions of influence beyond that of any politician (or religious counterpart). Each of these four great thinkers had a vital hand in defining how, at the peak of their civilisation, the Tiquaitan lived, not only having a huge bearing on one of the most remarkable civilisations in our continent’s history, but also on ourselves³ and how we choose to govern.



Footnotes:

1-   Starspotting, Rootreading and Tiletelling were esoteric forms of divination that many Tiquaitan (included the old Monarchy) used to predict the future and make decisions.

2-   The three warring kingdoms of Tsu, Chima and Jirai would eventually be united to form the Tiquaitan (or ‘Union of the Tiqua’)

3-   Us/Ourselves refers to the Tarshiinite men of Nybelmar’s Western Bay
« Last Edit: 05 April 2009, 17:12:30 by Artimidor Federkiel » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: 10 February 2009, 01:53:09 »

This has been here for a while....but its all pretty much original information (nothing to check it up agaisnt etc.) Would be nice if this could go up with the Tiquaitan tribe entry, which I'm pretty sure I can get finished soon!

Deci
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« Reply #2 on: 10 February 2009, 02:36:43 »

Deci, that is a cool little piece of writing and it is a shame, that nobody commented on it so far. You presented very clearly four (three) different worldviews. I like as well your statement, that they became so important because of the lack of a religion. I fear I have to read a bit more from your tribe, so far I only peeked into this entry.

Maybe somebody more educated in philosophy should have a look, from me you would get your blue arrow! :)
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« Reply #3 on: 10 February 2009, 05:14:26 »

I dreamed that I've been summoned... Strange...  grin

Anyway, let's look at this one:

- I guess we can make an own book in the Library dealing with thinkers, and "The Nature of Tiquaitan Thought" would be one chapter in that book.

- I'd put up a key title wehn you talk about each thinker, so that you know already what this is approximately about.

- Maybe also mention the ca. time these thinkers lived in, so that you know at least that it was thousands of year ago, or that they are recent pholosophers etc. Surely makes a difference.

- Interesting questions arise here with Aroonate Masmalama for example. How does Aroonate know that it aren't the dreams that are the real important thing (the actual truth in his terminology) and that the reality of regular life we experience as well is just something we need to dream? The last sentence about the conscious being BTW could be seen as a philosophical interpretation of what the Sarvonian elves call Avá. According to them reality and the fact that people dream is pretty much an echo of the "conscious being" Avá. So you might mention here perhaps such a cross-reference as a side note, that someone who obviously comes from a completely different direction, a non-religious one, comes to a pretty similar conclusion, only from the other side, based on realism and experiences made therein, while the elves take the spiritual approach...

- As for Susashale: I'd be interested how she defines "right" and "wrong", cause I think this is something you don't really explain in this short overview. If belief is out of the question, and existence is taken for granted, then who defines the rules? She seems to be jumping to conclusions without providing the reasons to do so. One might say that life prolongation is something nature's ok with, at least nature provides the means to do it - if you use these means properly. Susashale seems to me however like a naturalist that takes nature as it exists for granted, and as such wants to preserve it. So no progression here it seems, but nature then is seens as an absolute instance of morality. That should be elaborated a bit clearer I think.

- It's "alignment of the stars"

- Raretogaya: I'd in general recommend to get a touch of fantasy in here, that cloaks typical philosophical terminology a bit. For example that "Natural Consciousness" (and the explanation "unifying force between all organic constructs") sounds very, vey modern, it could also be written in a more poetic form, so that you don't hear Hegel stomping around in the background talking about the "Weltgeist". E.g. you could use terms like the "Breath of the World", or specific terms from a language you have over there that only indirectly describe a highly philosophical concept. When you mention "Starspotting, Rootreading and Tiletelling" this sounds much better already methinks, as it's more in line with a fantasy world.

- Also worth considering are Schools of Thought, which you only hint at. In Earthen history of philosophy it rarely happens that single individuals develop philosophies, rather they all derive more or less naturally from Schools of Thoughts, even though they give them their own accentuation. So it might help to think about these schools and categorize them at least very roughly, so that you know from what evolved from where and what as a reaction to that etc. Just the rough ideas would suffice perfectly.

For example the cynic Korania could have been the result of that philosophical debate going on before him (see previous thinkers). So it all has its cause and reasons :)
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« Reply #4 on: 10 February 2009, 05:45:00 »

Thanks Art! Very useful stuff!

I have a few quieries of my own though about your commentary:



Quote
Interesting questions arise here with Aroonate Masmalama for example. How does Aroonate know that it aren't the dreams that are the real important thing (the actual truth in his terminology) and that the reality of regular life we experience as well is just something we need to dream?

Am I right in assuming that you are asking, in simpler terms, that if we don't exist/are a figment of something's imagination than it is our own dreams that perhaps lead clues to the purpose of our existence- entailing there would be parallells between our reasons for dreaming and thereby the reasons why we are being dreamt?

Quote
According to them reality and the fact that people dream is pretty much an echo of the "conscious being" Avá. So you might mention here perhaps such a cross-reference as a side note, that someone who obviously comes from a completely different direction, a non-religious one, comes to a pretty similar conclusion, only from the other side, based on realism and experiences made therein, while the elves take the spiritual approach

If I am to mention this it would be a) from the point of Monk Sasarta, who as a scholar of the Sunshine Monastery would have some knowledge of Nybelmarian elves and b) briefly within the capacities of what is defined for Nybelmarianised Ava beliefs, not solely the central Sarvonian ideas. Is this ok?

Quote
As for Susashale: I'd be interested how she defines "right" and "wrong", cause I think this is something you don't really explain in this short overview. If belief is out of the question, and existence is taken for granted, then who defines the rules? She seems to be jumping to conclusions without providing the reasons to do so. One might say that life prolongation is something nature's ok with, at least nature provides the means to do it - if you use these means properly. Susashale seems to me however like a naturalist that takes nature as it exists for granted, and as such wants to preserve it. So no progression here it seems, but nature then is seens as an absolute instance of morality. That should be elaborated a bit clearer I think...

Would it be fair for me to envelope the idea that 'Nature by itself is perfect, so we should leave alone' defines Susashale's base morality, than develop further onto that how her perception of human behaviour relates to this e.g. how greed pillages the earth's resources, and thus disturbs nature. I could then draw even greater paralells between Raretogaya's ideas and Tsohamin culture (which the essay's author- Monk Sasarta- would be greatly prejudiced towards)!

Quote
Also worth considering are Schools of Thought, which you only hint at. In Earthen history of philosophy it rarely happens that single individuals develop philosophies, rather they all derive more or less naturally from Schools of Thoughts, even though they give them their own accentuation. So it might help to think about these schools and categorize them at least very roughly, so that you know from what evolved from where and what as a reaction to that etc. Just the rough ideas would suffice perfectly.

I would like to keep these as underlying as possible. While I understand they would be important to the foundations of the philosophy, this is intended to be part of the many works done by the great Monk Sasarta...I could always discuss them more extensively in a different essay acquirred by one of Decipher's Tarshiinite friends  buck



Once you can get back to me on those, I'll be ready to attack my entry!





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« Reply #5 on: 10 February 2009, 05:50:20 »

Quote
I dreamed that I've been summoned... Strange...

That was just a result of your fever ;)
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« Reply #6 on: 10 February 2009, 05:56:14 »

I don't know if you actually simplified it with your elaboration of the first idea, but yes, something like that ;)

References to Nybelmarianised Ava beliefs - yup, just feel free to make that work for you any way you prefer!

Fine with number 3 as well :)

And I'm also cool with it that you keep the lines of thought in the background for now. I'm just trying to provide some suggestions that can be elaborated to get the picture drawn in a more detailed way, but it's not a must of course. One can easily get drawn into the abyss of an neverending line of entries that would need to be written to just explain something ;)

So just take what you think you can use, and that alone makes me happy enough, as I know I've been of some use to get this all defined a bit better ;)
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« Reply #7 on: 10 February 2009, 06:17:19 »

This is very deep stuff, Deci, and I for one enjoy delving into these ideologies. I am especially impressed with the philosophy of, Aroonate Masmalama, and his ideas on reality. I do find, however, that I agree with Arti's opinion that you need to throw a little more fantastic and a little less science into this writing. Another thing I noticed is that there are a very few little grammatical mistakes in the entry. I will try to address those in the following:

‘The Nature of Tiquaitan Thought- by Monk Sasarta

Though Tiquaitan philosophy is probably the broadest in its subject matter, interpretations and opinions in all of Nybelmar, the four classical greats of the Tiquaitan Republic (or rather ‘Kingdom’, since their writings took place before the uprising against the monarchy) give a relatively vivid image of the philosophical landscape of this ancient civilisation.

Aroonate Masmalama

Aroonate (Ah-Roon-a-tay) Masmalama was categorised by his ‘asking of grand questions’, the focus of his work being the investigation into epic concepts such as reality and the validity of our existence. Aroonate’s work generally concerned itself it with fundamental matters of truth. Due to a lack of religion amongst the Tiquaitan men, there was no universally recognised idea on (I might use 'as to' rather than 'on' here. I just think it sounds better.) why we are here and what put us here in the first place. One of his most complex concepts was the idea of ‘Proving Reality’. Essentially, he argued that since reality is defined by what we perceive, and everyone perceives differently, the ‘truth’ behind ‘what reality is’ is ambiguous:

‘How do we define what is real? Truly what I see, what I feel, what I smell, hear and taste create my reality- constructing my environment through various recognisable pulses. This poses an issue. Surely, if ‘reality’ is defined by how I interpret the signals I experience, then the ‘reality’ experienced by someone else could be completely different (that is to say, a different interpretation). Ultimately, this means ‘reality’, a cornerstone of what we consider to be immovable truth, is in fact subject to constant, unregulated change. What at a first glance appears as adamant as rock is in fact as fluid as water’ (I love the language usage here!)

Through further development of this concept, Aroonate proposed many possible implications. He stated that by (in his eyes) proving ‘truth’ is a concept of unspoken variability, ‘hallucinations’ which others do not see could simply be considered ‘realities’ that others did not experience. He even went,9I don't believe that you need a comma here.) as far to say that our dreams produced temporary parameters of existence wherein the events were ‘real’, they simple just had no bearing on the general, core ‘reality’. He proposed, using these assumptions as outlines, that it was in fact possible that no one else actually existed and that you yourself are the only conscious being (everything else being a figment of your imagination [though passively]). (What do you mean here by "though passively"? Perhaps some further elaboration could be given here.)

Susashale Esiliate

Often regarded as Aroonate’s primary opponent, Susashale (Soo-sa-shay-el) dedicated her philosophical musings to matters of morality. Her most audacious act was her rejection of Aroonate’s central focus- famously quoted to have said, ‘It is inalienable that we, ourselves, do exist and as such; challenging the fabric of something so obvious is a horrid waste of everyone’s time’. Susashale was much more interested in investigating how to define ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ in the broad scope of Tiquaitan society. Due to the Tiquaitan Kingdom’s lack of divine belief, there was little in terms of ‘organised conduct’ as can be seen in the Tarshiinites today. As a result, Susashale’s teachings caused great debate amongst her contemporaries, but with a lack of social convention to support their arguments, much of what she said could only be challenged on a personal level, in one’s own mind.

Susashale’s most controversial writing was titled ‘The Modern Age and Our Abuse of Death’- wherein she challenged the usage of highly advanced medicine to prolong life. Though this may seem a relatively minor claim, the importance laid by the Tiquaitan on medicine and ‘pursuing immortality’ was enormous, and by challenging this Susashale had knowingly attacked the fabric of the day’s society. As perhaps a testament to her own influence, for long after her death ‘Esilatists’, as they were called, rejected all forms of medicine after being moved by Susashale’s writings- well aware of the fact that this would limit their lifespan considerably (in comparison to the other Tiquaitan of course). (This last little bit is kinda jumbled and confusing)

In her most comprehensive writing, ‘A Basis for Self-government’, Susashale discussed ideas of morality that spread throughout most aspects of Tiquaitan life. The areas addressed varied extensively between cruelty to animals, attitudes towards gluttony, the importance of appearance, the allure of vice and the danger of jealousy,and many more. Though the broad teachings of this woman in this particular context were received remarkably well, modern critics highlight a strong arrogance in her work, Susashale writes as though she is above these moral pitfall’s herself- condescending elevating her to a position above the rest of society. (I would like to have a little more information here as to what her exact stances on the above stated topics are. I think that this could help me to better understand just what her philosophy was. More excerpts, such as those used for Arooante, might paint a more vivid picture of her thought processes.)

Raretogaya Wahricora

Presumed to be a student of Arooante at some point, Raretogaya (Rah-ray-too-gai-yah) was known as ‘Nature’s Thinker’ amongst the philosophers of the time. Raretogaya chose to investigate what he called ‘Patterns of Nature’, a focus which modern critics consider as a digression of Aroonate’s fundamental questioning of reality. Much of what Raretogaya discussed revolved around the idea that there was innate symbolism in the (I don't know if the word 'the' is necessary here.) nature, which, should we find a way to decipher it, would provide us with an infinite knowledge and understanding.

In his sole publishing, ‘The Obvious Truth’, Raretogaya drew many parallels between the opposing arguments of Aroonate and Susashale. He sympathised heavily with Susashale’s ideas about ‘natural respect’ as well as using Aroonate’s somewhat vague musings about ‘the nature of truth’ to substantiate his own ideas. Raretogaya claimed that in every construct we could not control- from the shape of a tree’s branches to the alignment of the starts- was expressive of a ‘Natural Consciousness’, a very abstract concept detailing one unifying force between all organic constructs (though he is explicit to state it is not a ‘God’ in anyway). 9the end of this paragraph again get a little jumbled and confusing.)

Much of Raretogaya’s work, however, would seem to be confounded by his personal beliefs. Raretogaya’s teachings were in no way objective and, unlike most philosophers, did not seek to explain one vital facet of life. Raretogaya was a zealous believer and advocate of Starspotting, Rootreading and Tiletelling ¹, and many of his contemporaries and practically the entirety of modern critics regarded/regard his philosophies as arguments to substantiate his superstitious beliefs as opposed to personal realisations of great truth. (Why then is he considered one of the four greats of the time?)

Korania Neemabil

Though Korania himself published two individual writings (concerning primarily the relevance of Kunijen [The Faith of the Tsohamin Barbarians] in a modern society and an analysis of how social factors skew the validity of religious faith), Korania is famed primarily for his skills as a critic. Being an eloquent and cynical young man, Korania took it upon himself to find at least one flaw in the work of his colleagues, and in many cases explode (I don't know that explode was the word you were looking for here. exploited?) it to such a level that others would interpret perfectly valid arguments as nonsense. Korania is often revered as being the ‘quality control’ of Tiquaitan philosophy, since for something to be accepted into the mainstream, it needed to survive Korania’s meticulous examination.

Due to his somewhat supercilious role in the philosophical world, Korania made himself many enemies, though his annoyingly fine-tuned ability to make insulting critique, which, despite offensive quality, was completely valid, was uncontested. He was held in such a high esteem that in the height of his career many aspiring young philosophers would seek out Korania to ‘proof-read’ their ideas before having them published.

 Korania, tragically, was disgraced and discredited after the publishing of his most famous work, ‘The Pointlessness of Our Philosophy’, wherein he referenced practically every respected philosophical concept and argued it was useless and had no bearing on anything in reality, essentially arguing that pursuing philosophical truth was an ineffectual waste of time. Though many of Korania’s statements were perfectly valid, the outrage caused by challenging the professions of so many dedicated individuals was more than enough to force him into a social pariah. It would seem that rather than acknowledging the fact that their life choices could have been fundamentally flawed, the philosophers of the time were much happier to scorn anyone who suggested it.

Overall Importance

It is important to understand the context of these writings. Even before the three kingdoms united ² the citizens that would make up the Tiquaitan had made the decision to reject the organised religion that was held as so fundamental to us ³ for such a long time. Without any such concrete teachings to use as foundations for morality or truth, philosophers with enough respect were capable of ascending to positions of influence beyond that of any politician (or religious counterpart). Each of these four great thinkers had a vital hand in defining how, at the peak of their civilisation, the Tiquaitan lived, not only having a huge bearing on one of the most remarkable civilisations in our continent’s history, but also on ourselves³ and how we choose to govern.

(As I already stated, I quite like this entry. Most if not all of my comments are a bit nit-picky and likely not necessary, but in a entry as well written as this one anything substantially wrong is hard to find. I'm sorry I couldn't come up with more, but you can blame your own talent as a writer.
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Decipher Ziron
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« Reply #8 on: 11 February 2009, 21:12:55 »

Edits Made...

Satisfactory?
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Miés´efér Lytherá
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« Reply #9 on: 12 February 2009, 06:30:09 »

What a wonderful entry!  clap2
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« Reply #10 on: 14 February 2009, 05:15:41 »

*Tharoc, after taking three days to reach the second paragraph, staggers away with bloodshot eyes and a head which feels as if two Trolls are dancing inside it*
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Artimidor Federkiel
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« Reply #11 on: 14 February 2009, 17:26:29 »

Can you perhaps still add some sort of catchy title for each philosopher, Deci? Like "Aroonate Masmalama, Thinker of Xyz" etc. - this will help to see immediately what that philosopher is about when clancing at the entry, without having to read through it. Guess this should do it then :D
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« Reply #12 on: 15 February 2009, 01:03:50 »

There you go!

I suppose it can be blarrowed now?
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« Reply #13 on: 15 February 2009, 01:39:22 »

If you could just adjust these two little mistakes:

Quote
Eventually, she came to the conclusion that morality itself springs from the preservance > perseverance of nature, an idea eventually taken to extremes.

Her most audacious act was her rejection of Aroonate’s central focus- famously quoted to of have said ‘It is inalienable that we, ourselves, do exist and as such challenging the fabric of something so obvious is a horrid waste of everyone’s time’.

;)
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« Reply #14 on: 15 February 2009, 02:02:33 »

In your first example I actually meant to say preservance, not perserverance....but I've corrected the second one!
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