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Author Topic: Fourteen days to Yearturn  (Read 830 times)
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Irid alMenie
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« on: 14 February 2006, 15:54:00 »

In this thread I will post the various episodes of this story. As the story expands, more will be added. This first part is the explanation of what the story is about.

In the coldest part of the year, when the sun is farthest away from Caelereth, the people of Manthria celebrate the turning of the sun. This feast is called Yearturn, the day when Injèrá starts to move closer to the world again to bring warmth back to its peoples. It is celebrated in honour of Foiros the Sun-god who lets his light, the Injèrá, return after it has drifted away in the last part of the year. With the return of the sun the land will once again experience growth and prosperity later in the year. To celebrate this happy event people gather to greet the new year, often with a tradition which is very popular especially among children - the telling of tales until the day of the Yearturn arrives...

Two weeks before Frozen Rivers ends and Turning Star begins, a story is told by parents to their children. It is called ‘Fourteen days to Yearturn’. There actually exist quite a lot of stories that may be told during this period. Before they start, the parents will decide which story to tell. One example is that of a young man who goes out to sea in search of his love, another is the following:
On the first night, the story begins with the description of a Fern, but from then on the story develops as the parents wish it to. Mostly the characters in the story are predetermined, but the parents can choose which they add and which they leave out. They can also create new episodes as they go along. Every evening a part of the story is told, until after two weeks it is concluded. Every day, the title is one number down, until they come to ‘One day to Yearturn’ and finally ‘Yearturn’.
It is possible for the parents to share the telling of the story with the elder children. In that case, they would often let the eldest child tell the story on the first evening. This way they practice the storytelling for when they are parents themselves. The following two weeks they take turns in telling the story, either the two parents or the parents and the older children. When the family knows of a neighbour or a friend who lives alone, they will invite him or her in the evenings to help tell the story. In this way, no one needs to be alone during the two weeks of counting down to Yearturn.
Often, the whole family, together with those who shared in the storytelling, gathers on the day before Yearturn, or on Yearturn itself, to hear the ending of the story together. Beforehand, the adults agree who will end the story and in what way it will end. The ending may be used to help smaller children understand some circumstances better, as it contains a morale the younger ones can take with them into the new year – for example, when a much-loved grandfather has recently passed away the parents might decide to use an ending which will explain that not every adventure needs a happy ending, but that no death is in vain..

Another custom closely related to this storytelling, is one of laying down Topaz stones. On the first evening, someone lays the first Sunstone on a designated place. At the end of the two weeks, they form a circle, resembling the sun that is now coming back. The rest of the year the stones are kept in a safe place, because they are too precious for the children to play with.


The next part is what is told on the first evening.


Far away from here, in the dark lands of the Kuglimz, there is range of mountains called the Imlith mountains. The highest among them, Imlith Peak, is so high that snow lies on its summit all the year through. This story concerns them.
A long time ago, there were rumours of a plant very near the summit of Imlith Peak. Nothing survived there, except this one quite plain looking fern. And it was rumoured that this fern, for which none had a name, could heal almost any wound. But it was a far and dangerous journey, and a high climb, and if you should come to fall, nobody would ever find you. Besides, illness is something of this world, so why undertake such a journey for one injury? In short, no-one ever quite had the courage to search for this healing fern.

It is said that in the lands of the Kuglimz, far away from here, there is range of mountains called the Imlith mountains. The highest among them, Imlith Peak, is so high that snow covers its summit all the year through. And a little below the summit, there grows a fern. Many stories have been told of this fern. Some stories say that it heals almost every wound, when no other remedy helps. For some the cure is for physical pain, others say that it is meant to heal mental injuries. All who tell of it, agree that it is quite plain looking: the leaves are a sort of grey shade of green, the twigs are rather short. Allegedly, it blooms one day in the year, the same day every year, when the sun is set highest on the skies and the day is the longest. This however, no one has ever seen.
The tales about people who left to find this fern are also many. Not all returned from their quest, some returned with empty hands. This led to the belief that the fern did not exist, or that only a few people were able to find it, those few people that have a pureness of heart.
Over time, more and more people believed the first, that it was only invented to comfort the ill, to make them think that somewhere, there was a cure for them. Less and less people ventured to make the hazardous journey north to search for a plant they might not even find. But at night, some still told their children about the healing fern, that grew where nothing else would, on top of the Imlith Peak.

Stat rosa pristina nomine, nomina nuda tenemus

Edited by: Irid alMenie at: 2/14/06 20:56
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Irid al'Menie
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« Reply #1 on: 15 February 2006, 11:50:00 »

In the coldest part of the year, when the sun is farthest away from Caelereth, the people of Manthria celebrate the turning of the sun. This feast is called Yearturn, the day when Injèrá starts to move closer to the world again to bring warmth back to its peoples. It is celebrated in honour of Foiros the Sun-god who lets his light , the Injèrá, return after it has drifted away in the last part of the year. With the return of the sun the land will once again experience growth and prosperity later in the year. To celebrate this happy event people gather to greet the new year, often with a tradition which is very popular especially among children - the telling of tales until the day of the Yearturn arrives...

Two weeks before Frozen Rivers ends and Turning Star begins, a story is told by parents to their children. It is called ‘Fourteen days to Yearturn’. There actually exist quite a lot of stories that may be told during this period. Before they start, the parents will decide which story to tell. One example is that of a young man who goes out to sea in search of his love, another is the following:
On the first night, the story begins with the description of a Fern, but from then on the story develops as the parents wish it to. Mostly the characters in the story are predetermined, but the parents can choose which they add and which they leave out. They can also create new episodes as they go along. Every evening a part of the story is told, until after two weeks it is concluded. Every day, the title is one number down, until they come to ‘One day to Yearturn’ and finally ‘Yearturn’.
It is possible for the parents to share the telling of the story with the elder children. In that case, they would often let the eldest child tell the story on the first evening. This way they practice the storytelling for when they are parents themselves. The following two weeks they take turns in telling the story, either the two parents or the parents and the older children. When the family knows of a neighbour or a friend who lives alone, they will invite him or her in the evenings to help tell the story. In this way, no one needs to be alone during the two weeks of counting down to Yearturn.
Often, the whole family, together with those who shared in the storytelling, gathers on the day before Yearturn, or on Yearturn itself, to hear the ending of the story together. Beforehand, the adults agree who will end the story and in what way it will end. The ending may be used to help smaller children understand some circumstances better, as it contains a morale the younger ones can take with them into the new year – for example, when a much-loved grandfather has recently passed away the parents might decide to use an ending which will explain that not every adventure needs a happy ending, but that no death is in vain..

Another custom closely related to this storytelling, is one of laying down Topaz stones. On the first evening, someone lays the first Sunstone on a designated place. At the end of the two weeks, they form a circle, resembling the sun that is now coming back. The rest of the year the stones are kept in a safe place, because they are too precious for the children to play with.
What about  the start of a big feast as soon as  the last part is told. The descyption of the feast itself could be an extra entry though :)  


The next part is what is told on the first evening.


Far away from here, in the dark lands of the? Kuglimz, there is range of mountains called the Imlith Mountains. The highest among them, Imlith Peak, is so high that snow lies on its summit all the year through. This story concerns them.
A long time ago, there were rumours of a plant very near the summit of Imlith Peak. Nothing survived there, except this one quite plain looking fern. And it was rumoured that this fern, for which none had a name, could heal almost any wound. But it was a far and dangerous journey, and a high climb, and if you should come to fall, nobody would ever find you.Besides, illness is something of this world, so why undertake such a journey for one injury? In short, no-one ever quite had the courage to search for this healing fern.

It is said that in the lands of the Kuglimz, far away from here, there is range of mountains called the Imlith mountains. The highest among them, Imlith Peak, is so high that snow covers its summit all the year through. And a little below the summit, there grows a fern.   Many stories have been told of this fern.Some stories say that it heals almost every wound, when no other remedy helps. For some the cure is for physical pain, others say that it is meant to heal mental injuries. Why not exaggerate there a little more? All who tell of it, agree that it is quite plain looking: the leaves are a sort of grey shade of green, the twigs are rather short. Allegedly, it blooms one day in the year, the same day every year, when the sun is set highest on the skies and the day is the longest. This however, no one has ever seen.
The tales about people who left to find this fern are also many. Not all returned from their quest, some returned with empty hands. This led to the belief that the fern did not exist, or that only a few people were able to find it, those few people that have a pureness of heart.
Over time, more and more people believed the first, that it was only invented to comfort the ill, to make them think that somewhere, there was a cure for them. Less and less people ventured to make the hazardous journey north to search for a plant they might not even find. But at night, some still told their children about the healing fern, that grew where nothing else would, on top of the Imlith Peak.

***Astropic of the day***
"For me there is only the traveling on paths that have heart, on any path   that may have heart. There I travel, and the only worthwhile challenge is to traverse its full length. And there I travel looking, looking, breathlessly. ~Don Juan"

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"For me there is only the traveling on paths that have heart, on any path  that may have heart. There I travel, and the only worthwhile challenge is to traverse its full length. And there I travel looking,  breathlessly. ~Don Juan"
***Astropicture of the Day***Talia's Long, Long List***
Irid alMenie
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« Reply #2 on: 15 February 2006, 14:58:00 »

I edited in the two little things you said, and I will think a little about the other two. The second part is still under construction, so things will still be added there. The feast is a good idea ;)  

Stat rosa pristina nomine, nomina nuda tenemus

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Stat rosa pristina nomine, nomina nuda tenemus.
Irid al'Menie
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