THE DAINBEL PIE

DESCRIPTION - SERVING - HISTORY/ORIGIN

After the ever-so-popular malsapple pie spread through the kingdom, it was not long before variations were made. The Dainbel Pie is one such variation. Using dainbel berries to replace most of the malsapples allowed the use of less foridite; thus this pie became a popular dish among lowly and rich alike.

A Dainbel Pie

View picture in full size Image description. A banquet scene with the delicious dainbel pie. Picture drawn by Seeker.

Description. This pie differs in appearance, depending upon to whom it is served. For the poor, the pie usually sits unadorned on a simple plate with red juices oozing out. The pastry is flaky and tasty, but lacks embellishment. For the rich this pie stands as a much more sumptuous dessert. The crust is often decorated with intricate patterns and garnished with both foridite and extra berries. Beside the pie lies a dollop of Stratan Frothed Cream, a luxurious delicacy. Opulently yellow, spiced with exotic herbs and sweetened with malisehoney, this thick bubbled froth, like a wisp of a sunset cloud, complements the pie perfectly. Return to the top

Serving. Again the serving of this pie differs depending on one's social status. Those of meagre pockets usually serve it by itself, and as a little treat, sometimes with a few extra dainbels on top. Though orange berries taste best when baked in this pie, most villagers will use yellow as well. Crimson berries also can be cooked into this pie, though this gives the pie little taste. It is more common to use extra malsapples, fáberige in season, chopped pompion, or even the common 'stretcher' koeken, to fill it out instead.

Click on the book to read the pie's receipt.

For those wealthier, this pie becomes quite a delicacy. Served on fine crockery, beside a dollop of Stratan Frothed Cream, and topped off with the brightest berries, foridite and sometimes freshly grated cinnabark, it can be seen why this dessert is so loved. Return to the top

History/Origin. This delectable pie is thought to have originated in the Elverground, and to have been developed by the shire dwellers there. Judging by the size of the resident hobbits' bellies, this rumour seems well-founded! Their love for
malsapple pie is well-known; however they sought something other than the expensive foridite to sweeten it. The dainbel berries offered them their answer. Of course, over time the receipt spread and was modified with local ingredients: the addition of cinna is one such example. Return to the top

 Date of last edit 4th Sleeping Dreameress 1668 a.S.

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