SANTHALAN BEDTIME STORIES

TABLE OF CONTENTS - BEDTIME STORIES OVERVIEW

 

"The Santhalan Bedtime Stories" is the perfect book for Santharia's little ones, or more precisely for their mommies and daddies, who are supposed to read them in front of their children to make sure that they have a good night's sleep. The contents of this edition were collected by the brothers Hrumarg and Turdolf Ammering from New-Santhala, who put most commonly known children tales of the Rimmerins Ring area together in one single volume. A treasure no household with kids should miss! The Santhalan Bedtime Stories are short, but sweet, and provide light entertainment the youngest are so fond of.
 

Santhalan Bedtime Stories

COMPLETE BOOK: 26 PAGES Download text

Author
Story Title Pages Save Intro Text
ALYSSE THE LIKELY
The Rimrunner that Saved a Village 1 Download text Read introduction Read text
DEKLITCH HARDIN
The Dreadful Orcen Mage and the Brave Boy 2 Download text Read introduction Read text
JENNA SILVERBIRCH
How the Hob-Hound Came to Be 6 Download text Read introduction Read text
SETH GHIBTA
Sconder the Bean Thief 6 Download text Read introduction Read text
SHABAKUK ZEBORIUS ANFANG
The Bee's Gift (or: The Boy Who Was Good For Nothing) 9 Download text Read introduction Read text

 
The Bees' Gift
THE BEES'S GIFT (OR: THE BOY WHO WAS GOOD FOR NOTHING) 9 PAGES
WRITTEN BY SHABAKUK ZEBORIUS ANFANG Download text Read text

The tale of the “boy who was good for nothing” is known all over Sarvonia. It provides a mythological account of how humans learned to keep malise (honeybees) in hives, so as to collect a regular harvest of honey. Among scholars of mythology, the tale is famous for the prominent role played by the hiveling, a creature who summons a swarm of insects to form a temporary body for itself. - It is not thought polite to tell this story in the company of nobility, as its morality is suspected of being slyly subversive to the feudal social order.  Return to the top
 

The Dreadful Orcen Mage and the Brave Boy
THE DREADFUL ORCEN MAGE AND THE BRAVE BOY 2 PAGES
WRITTEN BY DEKLITCH HARDIN Download text Read text

The 'Dreadful Orcen Mage and the Brave Boy' is a tale told primarily by the storytellers amongst the Black Butterfly Rovers around the campfires of an evening. It teaches that all people, regardless of race, tribe or creed are worthy of friendship and kindness, rather than fear. A particular focus is on the outcast in society, especially as the Black Butterfly Rovers are themselves outcast. Some wandering storytellers have been overheard telling stories that are very similar to this, leading to speculation that different tribes and perhaps even races have their own version of this story. The incremental repetition is a feature of this type of story and it helps to reinforce the message of the story. Depending on the popularity of the story, the audience has been known to get so caught up in the story, that they join in on the repititive parts.

This version of the story refers to the early years of Ximax and the move of the Orcish Society of Enlightenment to the city. As most viewed orcs as little more than savage and blood thirsty beasts at that time, this story was set against that backdrop. The society, in time, became the Volkek-Oshra and these orcs became valued members of the Ximax community. The gold medallion that is given to Martyn is crafted by the Volkek-Oshra orcs to show that they are of that tribe. Return to the top

 

How the Hob-Hound Came to Be
HOW THE HOB-HOUND CAME TO BE 6 PAGES
WRITTEN BY JENNA SILVERBIRCH Download text Read text

'How the Hob-Hound Came to Be' is a version of a common halfling folk-tale, as narrated to Jenna Silverbirch by a farmer of the Dogodan shire. The halflings take great pleasure in accosting Big Folk travellers and telling them tall tales, some with a deal of truth in them, some with none, to see how readily they’ll believe in them. The Hob-Hound story is a favourite, and is also a popular bed-time story for hobbit children, although this particular version is by far one of the longest stories concerning the origin of the Hob-hound, perhaps designed to eat up as much of a big-folk traveller’s time as possible. Those versions intended to be bed-time stories for halfling children are greatly summarised and can be as much as a tenth of this version’s length. Note the frequent use of alliteration, a common device in many hobbit stories. Return to the top
 

The Rimrunner that Saved a Village
THE RIMRUNNER THAT SAVED A VILLAGE 1 PAGE
WRITTEN BY ALYSSE THE LIKELY Download text Read text

Here is a tale from the Rimmerins Ring, a tale of how the Rimrunner came to be. Read on, and discover how even that which is scorned and rejected can yet rise to great heights - indeed, may prove worthy to be celebrated and praised! This tale is a legend from the town of Onved, on the origins of the Rimrunner Terrier. Return to the top
 

Sconder the Bean Thief
SCONDER THE BEAN THIEF 6 PAGES
WRITTEN BY SETH GHIBTA Download text Read text

This folktale originates with the halflings of Dogodan Shire, where the prized sweet bean originates. Telling of the attempts of “Sconder”, a trickster character who often plagues gardeners in Halfling tales, to outwit the accomplished cook Mrs. Whetiker (possibly a corruption of Whittercorn, the household often attributed with the domestication of sweet beans). Also serving as an instructional tale against greediness, this tale is often given as the origin of the popular treat “bread-babies”, which are occasionally left out in gardens to keep birds off vegetables. Return to the top
 

Bedtime stories written by various members