Adventures of Caelereth

Archives => Approved Characters 2012 => Topic started by: Sadie Rosewood on September 03, 2012, 08:46:55 PM



Title: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Sadie Rosewood on September 03, 2012, 08:46:55 PM
Room for a hobbitess?


INTRODUCTION

Name: Sadie Rosewood

Gender: Female

Age: 33

Race: Hobbit

Tribe: Helmonds Shire

Occupation: Mother, Cook, Seamstress

Title: Mother of Thieves

Character Portrait: None

Overview: Sadie is a rather bubbly hobbit woman with a generous and maternal nature. She isn’t always the smartest of the bunch, and certainly never the strongest or the fastest, but she has a terribly big heart, and treats almost everyone with kindness.



APPEARANCE

Height: 1 Ped

Weight: 50 od

Hair Color: Sandy blonde

Eye Color: Blue-green

Physical Appearance: Sadie is not unlike other hobbit women, being rounded in body and cheerful in expression. Her rounded face is prone to smile, and she has an endearing array of freckles across her cheeks. Her curly, sandy-blonde hair falls about to her shoulders, and she will sometimes braid it to keep it back. Her furry feet are kept clean, though they are often hidden under her petticoats.

She has no real scars to speak of: those wounds she acquired as a child whilst cooking--minor cuts and burns on her hands and arms--are too faint to be of much notice to anyone. She has no tattoos, though her ears are pierced by little silver rings.

Clothing: Sadie wears a white under-shirt and a white petticoat over which she wears blue-green dress of rough cotton, with a square collar low enough to show the white frill of her undershirt and without sleeves so that the puffed sleeves of her undershirt show. The dress buttons up in the back, and falls all the way to her feet. Atop this she wears a white apron, and also often dons a blue-green bonnet of the same color as her dress. When traveling, she also wears her hooded cloak.



PERSONALITY AND ABILITIES

Personality: Sadie hasn’t seen much of the world, and is ignorant of many of the dangers in it. She doesn’t foresee difficulties or potentially deleterious situations resulting from the decisions she makes. But while this tendency may increase her chances of being placed in danger’s way, it can also lead her to get things done. She isn’t a nervous, timid, or fearful individual, and isn’t generally held back by such emotions.

She’s also rather guileless. It would shock her if she realized that there were in fact bad people in the world. She is inherently trusting. Being as ignorant as she is about the darker natures in the world, she tends to inspire in others a desire to protect her. People are more willing to speak with her and be open with her because they know she hasn’t a malicious bone in her little body and she isn’t at all the type to judge. However, it can also lead her to be taken advantage of.

Sadie can be rather forgetful, particularly of things and people who don’t really interest her or for whom she doesn’t much care. Before living with the band of thieves, she was married to a hobbit named Trevor, but since leaving the shire, she has never really thought much of him or wondered how he’s getting on without her. She doesn’t really think about things that aren’t right in front of her, and while this may lead her to forget things of importance, it also causes her to be a rather carefree individual.

Once upon a goal, Sadie pursues it whole-heartedly. As a young hobbit, she wished to have children, and so she did all she could to precipitate her having children. Alas, she never bore children of her own, but in her own way adopted a group of young thieves who became her children. Now that she wishes to spring them out of jail, she will likely pursue whole-heartedly the goal of raising the funds to buy their freedom.

Ask her about the band of thieves, and she will speak about each of them as though they were her flesh-and-blood child. Sadie is a mother at heart; though she never had children of her own, she loves to care for people of all ages. It’s in her nature to take people under her motherly wing, regardless of their age, race, or disposition. Occasionally her mothering can be a bit much, but she always acts with good intentions.


Strengths

Cook: Most who have tasted her cooking will agree that there are very few people who can cook like Sadie can. Her shepherd’s pie is heavenly, and some would swear that her beef and turnip stew had healing effects. She can take a desultory arrangement of meats and root vegetables and make a truly delicious meal (helped in part by her stash of spices).

Seamstress: By no means is she as good as a dedicated worker of the sartorial trades, but Sadie can certainly make simple pieces of clothing--pants, shirts, dresses, cloaks, etc.--without being wasteful of cloth and thread. She is very adapt, however, at mending clothing, having done so all her life, not only when she was a little hobbitling at home, but also when she became the mother of her band of thieves.

Nurse: She is certainly no healer or herbalist, and knows no magic, but she has lots of experiences bandaging up wounds and has even splint a few broken bones in her time. She knows the basics of first aid, including the application of Miyu and Yahrl. And of course, she knows that the best medicine for any ailment is love... and lots and lots of home-cooked food.


Weaknesses

Physically Weak: Don’t dare ask Sadie to lift a sword or battle-axe or rush into a fight. She hasn’t much strength to her. Sure, she’s got enough energy to cook for a family of 11 and never miss a beat, but she’s not very strong at all and may even occasionally require help chopping wood.

Slow: Her legs are rather small compared to Big Folk, and it takes her much longer to get places than it may take for others. Sadie isn’t very adept at running, and would wear out easily, though she can certainly keep up a nice, slow pace... particularly if it’s a beautiful day and she has something to snack on as she walks.

Short: Don’t laugh--being short is quite an inconvenience! It is much easier for her to be overlooked or forgotten because she’s a bit out of view. One of the most frustrating things is to try to cook in a Big Folk’s kitchen!--for Sadie, there is certainly nothing so awful as not being able to reach the salt and flour upon an upper shelf.



HISTORY

Sadie was born the sixth of eight children, six boys and two girls. She had a very happy life growing up in a large family with lots of siblings with which to play. She greatly enjoyed helping her mother cook for the family and even helped to sew patches into the torn clothing of her siblings (specifically her brothers). She knew from a very young age, therefore, that she wanted to have children. Lots and lots of children.

In her goal to have many, many children, though, she first needed to procure a husband, and this was done fairly easily, as there were many suitable hobbit men in her village. She ended up marrying a hobbit named Trevor Rosewood--more out of convenience than love. While he was very nice and docile, he could be a bit clumsy and was allergic to all sorts of things, including turnips, doch nuts, and honey. Which unfortunately limited Sadie’s cooking and baking options.

Still, he was a husband, and soon after they were married they tried to have children. They tried and tried, but a year went by and still Sadie wasn’t pregnant. Frustrated, she went to visit her sister’s neighbor’s son-in-law’s great aunt, who knew all about these sorts of things, and asked her how she might remedy the situation. “Milkweed,” replied the old hobbitess. “Lots of milkweed.”

Well, if milkweed would get her children, then milkweed it was! Sadie began by simply steeping it in tea, but as the months went by and she still wasn’t having any luck, she tried to consume more and more of it, and soon found herself coming up with all sorts of creative ways to work it into her diet. There were milkweed muffins, milkweed teanish, and milkweed pie. She would put milkweed into her bread and cookies, into her soups and stews.

Still, nothing. And all that milkweed was getting to be expensive!

Fortunately, their collection of taenish were producing an unprecedented amount of eggs (Sadie couldn’t help but wonder if those silly birds were trying to mock her misfortune!). Unfortunately, everyone else’s taenishes were, too. And so it was that in order to sell eggs, the couple would have to go to the nearest human town and hope that the taenishes elsewhere were not as productive as their own.

Sadie and Trevor arranged their baskets of eggs to take to town, but the night before, Trevor accidentally consumed one of the cookies a neighbor had baked for them, which happened to have a doch nut in it, and Trevor puffed up like a ripe meldarapple and broke out in hives. He had recovered a bit by the next morning, but not enough to go to town with his wife. So she donned her blue-grey cloak, pressed her little white apron, took up her pack (filled with lunch, second lunch, third lunch, and pre-dinner) and went off to town by herself.

It was quite a long walk--particularly for a little hobbitess, who is ever so small. An old miller, passing by with his horse and cart, must have thought so, too, because the man offered Sadie a ride, and she, accepting, hopped on to the back of his cart, which was filled with bags of flour and other milled grains to sell at the town market.

The sun was shining and the ride was rather pleasant. Sadie contentedly ate lunch and then second-lunch aboard the cart. She was sitting there with her slice of shepherd’s pie almost all eaten when she heard something out of the woods and a gang of thieves attacked! Several of them pushed the miller from his seat, and the ruckus caused Sadie to topple over into the bags of grain. The thieves, who all appeared to be rather young humans, must not have noticed her. They drove the horse and cart into the wood toward their camp.

Once at the camp, the leader of the thieves, who seemed quite young, appeared rather disappointed that the loot stolen was merely flour. “Flour! What will we do with flour? Couldn’t you have stolen jewels or weapons or something?” And then it was to the surprise of all of them that they saw the hobbitess in the midst of the flour. They were all quite taken aback, and very uncertain of what to do.

The leader of the thieves simultaneously berated the thieves, tried to discuss what to do with the hobbit, and apologized to Sadie for the inconvenience. “You imbeciles! Didn’t you think to check? Perhaps we should kill her, since she knows our hide-out.” (Then, turning to the hobbitess) “I’m terribly sorry. We’re all still a bit new at this bandit thing.”

Sadie insisted it was no problem at all, but that she would rather like to live, if that was all right with all of them. The thieves said it was, and in fact they would rather not kill her if such could be avoided, since they really had no experience with murder, and it seemed difficult and rather messy. Eventually the leader, distraught, sat on the ground with his head in his hands. “We don’t know what to do with the hobbit. We don’t know what to do with the flour. What a mess!”

“Well, you can always bake something with the flour,” offered Sadie. “Perhaps some bread--or even cake.”

“You can make cake from flour?” asked one of the thieves.

It soon became clear that none of them knew anything about baking or cooking, and were amazed to learn the many uses of flour. Sadie offered to bake for them, if they would be so kind as to provide her with a few other necessary ingredients like yeast, salt, sugar, etc. And so the thieves gingerly went out, stole the supplies, and Sadie baked them all cake, which delighted everyone involved.

And so it happened that Sadie became the cook for the band of thieves. There were 10 of them, all boys and none of them older than 13--one as young as 9. Most of them seemed to be orphans, others were runaway, but all of them were in need of a mother: a role Sadie was happy to fill. After many years of wishing for a large family, Sadie finally got one.

And they were all quite happy. The boys would go out and steal, and Sadie would stay at the camp (which, with some guidance and many failed attempts, eventually grew into a wooden house) and keep the fire going, mend the thieves’ clothing, and make sure they were all well-fed.

For the next several years Sadie cared for the little band of thieves as they went about and stole things--mostly foods and little knickknacks. The hobbit would have rather they invested some time in learning other skills rather than steal, but they were all so very poor, and it was hard to find honest work.

The thieves, for their part, were ever-so-grateful to Sadie for taking such good care of them. Most of them had never known a mother, and those that did had only known rather neglectful or irresponsible ones, so one who cooked for them and kissed their boo-boos and sang them to sleep was rather novel and utterly delightful, to say the least.

And for all Sadie did for them, the thieves were eager to do something very nice for their hobbit mother. She was approaching her 33rd birthday, which the thieves had learned was rather auspicious in the life of a hobbit, and so they resolved to get her a nice gift. But what? One of the thieves suggested stealing a house for her, but they all decided that a house would be too big to carry back. What about a pair of nice walking shoes? But none had ever seen shoes wide enough for a hobbit’s feet. Maybe a ring? No, hobbits and rings generally don’t mix well. Well, what about an electric food processor? No, those don’t exist yet in Santharia.

It was after much discussion and debate that the band of thieves decided upon getting her some cloth so that she could make herself a nice dress. They could get one in a nice color, and because Sadie was rather small, they wouldn’t need to steal much--they could even just steal a large cape, and that would likely be satisfactory.

And indeed they found a rather nice cape--a green one with elegant floral designs--and so they tried to steal it. Unfortunately, the cape happened belong to the governor of the town, and he happened to be wearing it at the time the thieves decided to steal it. The band of thieves, it seemed, had slightly over-estimated their thieving skills, and it should likely come as no surprise that the guards immediately caught the collection of thieves, and threw them--every single one--into jail.

Sadie was very worried when her thieves didn’t come home, though she was relieved to learn that they were in jail--that is, until she learned what a jail was, after which point she was much more worried than before. She brought the thieves cake in jail, and they sung Happy Birthday to her, and she resolved that she would try to get them out of jail.

So she returned to camp for the last time, donned her blue-grey cloak, pressed her little white apron, took up her pack (filled with lunch, second lunch, third lunch, and pre-dinner) and went off into the world by herself to try to earn enough money to get her little thieves out of jail.



BELONGINGS

In a bag, which she wears like a back-pack, she carries most of her things: some light-weight cooking supplies, including a collection of spices; a few medical supplies, such as Yahrle, Miyu; some cloth (which can be use either for bandages or for patching up clothes); a needle and some thread; a bit of money; and a collection of viands.

In a woven basket, she carries at least three meals (second breakfast, first lunch, second lunch, third lunch, pre-dinner, first dinner... it really all depends on the time of day!)


Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Tak on September 07, 2012, 02:08:49 AM
Hello and welcome Sadie!  There is always room for more short people!  

I've taken a look at your CD and thus far it looks very good - I can't see any need for an extensive overhaul.  Just a few minor things.  (I love the character, she'll be fun to play)

How the group of thieves got into jail need a little work.

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And indeed they found a rather nice cape--a green one with elegant floral designs--and so they tried to steal it. Unfortunately, the cape happened belong to the governor of the town, and he happened to be wearing it at the time the thieves decided to steal it. It should therefore come as no surprise that the guards immediately caught the collection of thieves, and threw them--every single one--into jail.


Several years have gone by, so the oldest is at least 15 and the youngest at least 11.  They're young not stupid, they would know who the governor of the town is and they would not steal a cloak while he was wearing it.  This isn't too big of a change (they tried to steal it from his house at night for example) but I can't believe that a gang of thieves who have been successful and not a single one caught for several years would try and steal a cloak while someone was wearing it.

Also, I'm not sure that all of them could have been caught at once.  If they all scattered it would be very hard to grab them all up.  Maybe the guards caught one or two so the rest decided to try and spring them from jail only to get caught themselves?  Or there was a set-up?  After all, a group of thieves 'terrorizing' a town/area for years would be something the governor/guards would want to take care of.



After that there are a handful of spelling and grammar mistakes:

Quote
She’s also rather guileless. It would shock her if she realized that there were in fact bad people in the world. She is inherently trusting. Being as ignorant as she is about the darker natures in the world, she tends to inspire in others a desire to protect her. People are more willing to speak with her and be open with her because they know she hasn’t a malicious bone in her little body and she isn’t at all the type to judge. However, it can also lead her to be taken advantage of.

Quote
Nurse: She is certainly no healer or herbalist, and knows no magic, but she has lots of experiences bandaging up wounds and has even splint a few broken bones in her time. She knows the basics of first aid, including the application of Miyu and Yahrl. And of course, she knows that the best medicine for any ailment is love... and lots and lots of cook, home-cooked food.

Quote
Sadie was born the sixth of eight children, six boys and two girls. She had a very happy life growing up in a large family with lots of siblings with which to play. She greatly enjoyed helping her mother cook for the family and even helped to sew patches into the torn clothing of her siblings (specifically her brothers). She knew from a very young age, therefore, that she wanted to have children. Lots and lots of children.

Quote
Sadie and Trevor arranged their baskets of eggs to take to town, but the night before, Trevor accidentally consumed one of the cookies a neighbor had baked for them, which happened to have a doch nut in it, and Trevor puffed up like a ripe meldarapple and broke out in hives. He had recovered a bit by the next morning, but not enough to go to town with his wife. So she donned her blue-grey cloak, pressed her little white apron, took up her pack (filled with lunch, second lunch, third lunch, and pre-dinner) and went off to town by herself.

Quote
It was quite a long walk--particularly for a little hobbitess who is ever so small. An old miller passing by with his horse and cart must have thought so too, because the man offered Sadie a ride. She, accepting, hopped on to the back of his cart that was filled with bags of flour and other milled grains to sell at the town market.
- Split into two sentences, fixed some grammar, too much to highlight.  You are a very comma happy hobbit.

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The sun was shining and the ride was rather pleasant. Sadie contentedly ate lunch and then second-lunch aboard the cart. She was sitting there with her slice of shepherd’s pie almost all eaten when she heard something out of the woods and a gang of thieves attacked! Several of them pushed the miller from his seat, and the ruckus caused Sadie to topple over into the bags of grain. The thieves, who all appeared to be rather young humans, must not have noticed her. They drove the horse and cart into the wood toward their camp.

Quote
The leader of the thieves simultaneously berated the thieves, tried to discuss what to do with the hobbit, and apologized to Sadie for the inconvenience. “You imbeciles! Didn’t you think to check? Perhaps we should kill her, since she knows our hide-out.” Then, turning to the hobbitess, “I’m terribly sorry. We’re all still a bit new at this bandit thing.”

Quote
It soon became clear that none of them knew anything about baking or cooking, and were amazed to learn the many uses of flour. Sadie offered to bake for them, if they would be so kind as to provide her with a few other necessary ingredients like yeast, salt, sugar, etc. And so the thieves gingerly went out, stole the supplies, and Sadie baked them all cake, which delighted everyone involved.
- only need one period for ect.

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And so it happened that Sadie became the cook for the band of thieves. There were about 10 of them, all boys and none of them older than 13--one as young as 9. Most of them seemed to be orphans, others were runaway, but all of them were in need of a mother: a role Sadie was happy to fill. After many years of wishing for a large family, Sadie finally got one.
- No spelling or grammar here - but if Sadie considers the thieves to be her children she would know how many there were and what age they are.  Feel free to change my age edit how you see fit.

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And they were all quite happy. The boys would go out and steal, and Sadie would stay at the camp (which, with some guidance and many failed attempts, eventually grew into a wooden house) and keep a fire going, mend the thieves’ clothing, and make sure they were all well-fed.

Quote
For the next several years Sadie cared for the little band of thieves as they went about and stole things--mostly goods and little knickknacks. The hobbit would have rather they invested some time in learning other skills rather than steal, but they were all so very poor, and it was hard to find honest work.

Quote
And for all Sadie did for them, the thieves were eager to do something very nice for their hobbit mother. She was approaching her 33rd birthday, which the thieves had learned was rather auspicious in the life of a hobbit, and so they resolved to get her a nice gift. But what? One of the thieves suggested stealing a house for her, but they all decided that a house would be too big to carry back. What about a pair of nice walking shoes? But none had ever seen shoes wide enough for a hobbit’s feet. Maybe a ring? No, hobbits and rings generally don’t mix well. Well, what about an electric food processor? No, those don’t exist yet in Santharia.
- I hate to do it, but if this is the kids talking then modern stuff has to go.  I'll let the ring bit stay though.

(Edit: Edited my own grammar and spelling mistakes!)


Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Sadie Rosewood on September 07, 2012, 05:24:20 PM
Most of the corrections I've taken! I've colored them in yellow. Some of them I decided not to take:

I much prefer "keep the fire going" to "keep a fire going", as the familiarity with the definite article implies a coziness. What is your reasoning behind making in indefinite?

I kept the bit about the food processor. Did you think this is something that the kids actually said and not something that was meant to be taken humorously? If you don't think it's clear that this is meant to be taken humorously, how do you think the sentence can be changed to make this clear? (After all, cutting it completely seems a bit extreme).

I also kept in how the kids got caught. Yes, the kids are young, and while not all young kids are stupid, there are quite a few who are! (Also remember that, particularly in young men, the risk-assessment portions of the brain aren't actually fully developed until early- to mid-twenties). Keep in mind that these are kids who stole a cart of flour without knowing exactly what it was or how to use it. And keep in mind, too, that until now the kids basically stole to get by--food rather than valuable material goods.

Thanks for the comments! You did an excellent job at catching some of those harder-to-find mistakes.  ;)


Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Tak on September 07, 2012, 10:54:20 PM
I much prefer "keep the fire going" to "keep a fire going", as the familiarity with the definite article implies a coziness. What is your reasoning behind making in indefinite?

Keeping the fire going implies there is only one fire and it is the same fire for the several years she is there – it gives it an added importance.  A fire makes it less important (like keeping THE Olympic flame going as opposed to an Olympic flame going).  I wasn't sure if it was intentional or not.  This isn't a huge edit though.  The others I'm a little more adamant about.

I kept the bit about the food processor. Did you think this is something that the kids actually said and not something that was meant to be taken humorously? If you don't think it's clear that this is meant to be taken humorously, how do you think the sentence can be changed to make this clear? (After all, cutting it completely seems a bit extreme).

The way the paragraph is written it's implied that it's the kids brainstorming.  The quickest and easiest way to deal with it is just taking it out all together (it is just a quip after all).  I'm not sure how you would change it to remove that one line from the context of the boys brainstorming (even then it still may be a bit too out of place).  I'll ask the other mods and see what they think – if I get vetoed I'm happy to let it slide. 

I also kept in how the kids got caught. Yes, the kids are young, and while not all young kids are stupid, there are quite a few who are! (Also remember that, particularly in young men, the risk-assessment portions of the brain aren't actually fully developed until early- to mid-twenties). Keep in mind that these are kids who stole a cart of flour without knowing exactly what it was or how to use it. And keep in mind, too, that until now the kids basically stole to get by--food rather than valuable material goods.

Well mention that.  The reason I have a problem with this is it doesn't quite fit what's been told - bad judgement was only there once and it is assumed that they fixed that as the years have gone by.  You can spin the story to make this work (They've never been caught – so they thought they were invincible).  Maybe some of the towns folk even knew about the kids and let it all slide out of pity/charity?  I think one of my edits was changing what they stole from “good and little knickknacks” to “goods and little knickknacks”.  If you change the “goods” to “food” and add in something about the kids thinking they are unmatchable I think you'll be in the clear.

Thanks for the comments! You did an excellent job at catching some of those harder-to-find mistakes.

You're very welcome!


Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Ta'lia of the Seven Jewels on September 08, 2012, 04:24:56 AM
Rosie, what a delightful CD! :) So effortlessly to read through.

I loved it right from the beginning to the end. I personally don't mind what Tak critisizes, for it might not be entirely correct for a CD, but your style is so fairy-tale-like, that it just fits as it is (all thieves caught etc).

If you work in some of his proposals (e.g. that they tried to steal it from the house in the night and thought they were unmatchable - maybe they all were trapped by a ..monstrous big dog... ) try to keep that fairy-like style.

One thought about your weakness 'weak' though. It is a weakness, but I would describe it a bit differently. She is not weak in every sense, she has to be quite strong to look after 11 mouths in a wood (you cannot call a woman weak who is able to do that). Maybe stress, that she is perservering (?) , but not strong when it comes to chopping wood or lifting heavy bags etc.

Btw, you have a big word pool, there were several words I had to look up! :)

Ah yes - I loved that sentence and I'm all for keeping it, it made me laugh out loudly:

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Well, what about an electric food processor? No, those don’t exist yet in Santharia.





Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Sadie Rosewood on September 14, 2012, 04:50:53 PM
Keeping the fire going implies there is only one fire and it is the same fire for the several years she is there – it gives it an added importance.  A fire makes it less important (like keeping THE Olympic flame going as opposed to an Olympic flame going).  I wasn't sure if it was intentional or not.  This isn't a huge edit though.  The others I'm a little more adamant about.

Quotes! How wonderful. "Keep the fires going" is also idiomatic, so I'd like to keep it.  :)


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The way the paragraph is written it's implied that it's the kids brainstorming.  The quickest and easiest way to deal with it is just taking it out all together (it is just a quip after all).  I'm not sure how you would change it to remove that one line from the context of the boys brainstorming (even then it still may be a bit too out of place).  I'll ask the other mods and see what they think – if I get vetoed I'm happy to let it slide. 

Is Ta'lia favourable opinion of the sentence a veto? What is the consensus?


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Well mention that.  The reason I have a problem with this is it doesn't quite fit what's been told - bad judgement was only there once and it is assumed that they fixed that as the years have gone by.  You can spin the story to make this work (They've never been caught – so they thought they were invincible).  Maybe some of the towns folk even knew about the kids and let it all slide out of pity/charity?  I think one of my edits was changing what they stole from “good and little knickknacks” to “goods and little knickknacks”.  If you change the “goods” to “food” and add in something about the kids thinking they are unmatchable I think you'll be in the clear.

I will work on this edit! So just changing good to food and making some mention of their feelings of superior thieving skill?


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Rosie, what a delightful CD!  So effortlessly to read through.

I loved it right from the beginning to the end. I personally don't mind what Tak critisizes, for it might not be entirely correct for a CD, but your style is so fairy-tale-like, that it just fits as it is (all thieves caught etc).

Thank you, Ta'lia! I wanted to have a bit of a comedic fairy-tale feel to it.  :grin:


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One thought about your weakness 'weak' though. It is a weakness, but I would describe it a bit differently. She is not weak in every sense, she has to be quite strong to look after 11 mouths in a wood (you cannot call a woman weak who is able to do that). Maybe stress, that she is perservering (?) , but not strong when it comes to chopping wood or lifting heavy bags etc.

So I should add that she is physically weak (as opposed to emotionally weak). I'm not sure if she is persevering. Some things (like care-giving) just come naturally.


Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Tak on September 18, 2012, 11:43:01 PM
Quotes are fun aren't they?

Go ahead and keep "the fire".

I have been vetoed, the food processor stays!

Make it food and mention the feeling of being awesome thieves and you're good to go with my edits :D


Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Malexia Vendu on September 19, 2012, 11:33:24 PM
I'm happy with this.

Approved.  :pet:


Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Sadie Rosewood on September 20, 2012, 08:43:24 PM
Thank you, Malexia!

I have integrated the other requested changes. Please let me know if there is anything else. Thank you!


Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Tak on September 22, 2012, 11:36:52 PM
Looks good to me. 

Approved!  :thumbup:

Please remove the color from your changes and we'll get you titled.


Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Sadie Rosewood on September 27, 2012, 02:30:56 PM
The yellow correction color has been removed. I hope you'll permit the others.  ;) Thank you!


Title: Re: Sadie Rosewood / Helmonds Shire Hobbit / Mother
Post by: Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin on November 28, 2012, 09:39:27 PM
 :undecided:  Many apologies, Sadie.  I must have missed the colour removal.  Thank you Shen for pointing this little gem out to me.

Titled and archived.  Congrats. :D