* 
Welcome Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?


*
gfxgfx Home Forum Help Search Login Register   gfxgfx
gfx gfx
gfx
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]
Print
Author Topic: Fisah-eck-Shanno "Snowflake", Gathorn Mountains, Insect  (Read 20889 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin
Santh. Member
***

Gained Aura: 144
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2.416


The Remusian


View Profile
« Reply #45 on: 02 October 2009, 06:10:55 »

I'm going to open this up officially to comments now. :D  Hope to get this finished by next update.
Logged

"Lather...Rinse...Repeat"   Why has God made my life so complicated?

This is what I'm working on
Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang
Santh. Member
***

Gained Aura: 192
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1.318



View Profile
« Reply #46 on: 02 October 2009, 07:39:11 »

Hi Altario,

it's a wonderfully imagined creation, a tiny terror: a monster of beautiful, etherial looks and deadly effect. I like that there is a way of protecting oneself from it, too! The myth of Uragadze is hauntingly, Remusianly rough & plain, with a breathtaking transformation of the fatal snowflakes into the saviour goddess. Aura for creating and finishing this beast!

Comments, questions and praises in orange, straightforward corrections and stylistic suggestions in limegreen. I hope I've not given too many stylistic suggestions; if I have, you can always ignore them.


Basic Overview of the Beast
Deep within the heart of the Gathorn Mountains can be found a strange insect.  Called the Fisah-eck-Shanno by the Remusians, which means Snowflake, it is a strange insect that (repetition) causes terror in the hearts of those who are unlucky enough to come across it.  Beautiful, yet repulsive at the same time, it may be the last thing one ever sees before a painful death.

         Appearance
This insect is about two nailsbreadth across.  By far, the majority of this measurement is taken up by its legs, as the body is often not much bigger than the head of a nail.  In adulthood, it appears like a cross between a white fluffy spider and, when aloft, a large snowflake; hence its name.  Two small pink to red eyes can be seen on its bulbous body, if one looks closely enough.  This body is round and furry, and has six to eight legs protruding from it, apparently in every direction.  It is unknown as to why individual insects have a different number of legs.  It has been put forward that perhaps, while in the froth, that some lose legs. (Maybe say: “It has been suggested that Snowflakes may occasionally lose a leg or two in the frost.” – Also, I think you need to say here what you mean by froth. When I read this, I assumed you meant ‘frost’; and only found out about the true meaning of froth when you explain it under ‘Habitat’.) Other scholars surmise that maybe it is because some of the maggots complete their metamorphosis at different times, and that insects with eight legs simply changed earlier than those with six. (Why would earlier metamorphosis provide you with a greater number of legs? Am I missing something?) Underneath (Underneath what? Maybe say: “On the Snowflake’s underside …”), a large(I know what you mean, yet ‘large’ seems a discordant adjective to describe the proboscis of a tiny insect; I suggest to omit it) hollow proboscis juts out; it is white, with a grayish black hard chitinous point, and is used for injecting into a host.

In the larvae stage, the Snowflake has a milky grey body, and resembles a maggot of only a few grains in length.  Tiny black feet can be seen, which it uses to move itself along.  A large sucker like a mouth is at the one end, and if one looks close enough, a row of tiny sharp teeth can be observed. (Hm. Can Santharian researchers really discern the teeth of a creature so small? Wouldn’t you need a microscope?)
        
         Special Abilities
In winter, when these creatures mature, they can fill their bodies up with air, like a balloon, and can be carried on the wind, searching for their prey, and a place to lay their eggs. (Ha! I like that! Sweet little snowflakes dancing in the wind… So you can escape them, if you go upwind of them?) If there is no wind, the snowflakes will simply crawl along the ground on their own legs.  They can cover a distance of a ped in roughly 15-20 blinks, thus moving on the wind is usually much faster for them, and as such, makes them deadlier.

They are also quite resistant to the cold, and can survive the coldest of northern winters.  It is true that fewer froths (again, the reader may be confused as to the meaning of ‘froth’ at this point, unless you explain it above) are disturbed in winter, but it does happen.  Scholars are unsure why they remain active in winter, and some have surmised that it is because of the antifreezing effects of the hrugchuk grass, that is eaten by many of the victims of the Fisah-eck-Shanno.

         Territory
These creatures can be found in the Gathorn Mountains, and as far south as the Heaths of Wilderon.  There have been reports of them outside of this area, but these reports are rare, and largely unconfirmed.  It is thought that the Snowflake's short lifespan prevents much migration of the species.
    
         Habitat/Behavior
Larval snowflakes gather in what’s called a froth.  Hundreds, if not thousands, of these small maggot-like insects gather in a ball, each producing a sticky substance that bubbles and covers the entire froth.  This sickly light brown secretion then hardens, forming a protective shell around the maggots.  This hardened shell protects the maggots until conditions are right for it to transform.  Some think that this condition is based on weather, for spring is when most of these froths awaken.  Still others surmise that it is the proximity of a host, as froths can break open at anytime of the year.

Regardless of what brings on the awakening, the hard shell of the froth cracks, then the mature snowflakes emerge; hundreds of them.  It is at this point that they become deadly.  These adult snowflake crawl, or roll, along on their new long legs.  As they do, their bodies swell, as an air bladder inside them fills.(Too much scientific accuracy, mayhap? Maybe it’s enough that Santharians think that the Snowflakes fill their bodies with air? Do they need to have dissected one and discovered a bladder, which in any case they would (again) probably need a microscope for?)  If there is a breeze, many of them will be lifted into the air, where they float seemingly weightless in the currents (… in the winds[?]).  It is this sight , hundred of tiny blowing white balls of fluff floating in the wind that got them their name.

Any animal, or gods forbid, man that finds themselves in the path of these creatures is in dire straits at best.  At the ends of each of the snowflake’s (add apostrophe) legs are a set of sharp pincers (Same concern as with teeth and bladder: Wouldn’t you need a microscope to detect the pincers? Isn’t it enough detail to tell us that these legs can grab? ) that grab onto hair, thread, fur, etc.  Once attached to a host, the snowflake injects eggs into the skin.  It takes only a moment of time for this to happen, as it seems the snowflake is released from the froth already carrying viable eggs.  Up to a dozen eggs can be injected into the skin from the snowflake at once. (Same concern about microscopic size with the eggs… If I’ve convinced you, you could describe the egg-laying process as something that the researchers infer must happen, rather than something that they can see with their own eyes?

It takes only a few minutes before the area around the eggs becomes inflamed.  Within an hour, the eggs begin to hatch into maggots of less than a grain in length.  These maggots are voracious eaters and begin to burrow into the flesh deeper.  Within a day, the host is usually dead.  A couple days after that, a man sized host will be devoured completely, with nothing left but the bones.

The maggots will then travel together, looking for a suitable place to hide, usually under logs, boulders, hollows of trees, even in the crook of tree branches.  They will begin then to gather in a tight ball, once more secreting the sticky fluid and forming a froth. (I’ve read this before, of course, when looking for the background information to your hiveling myth – but I have to say it doesn’t get any more pleasant to think about by reading it twice! ;) )

         Diet
Larval snowflakes feed on nearly anything, from the flesh of their host, to vegetable matter and carrion.  They are voracious eaters, eating several times their own weight in a relatively short amount of time.

As adults, it does not appear that they eat.  If these creatures do not find a host in which to lay their eggs, they appear to die within a day or two.  It is this fact alone that keeps the snowflake population from growing completely out of control.  If they do find a host, it seems that the energy expended in laying the eggs leaves the Fisah-eck-Shanno nearly dead.  Within a few hours at most, the creature will die.

         Mating
There does not seem to be any mating ritual between individual snowflakes.  In fact, there do not seem to be any sexes at all, within the snowflake species.  All snowflakes seem capable of laying eggs, which do not need fertilization.  The snowflakes emerge from the froth able to lay eggs immediately.  Also, the maggots can lay eggs once they are implanted in a host.  Within a day, as they devour the flesh, more maggots will be born. (Shudder!)

Usages
There is no known use for adult Snowflakes.  However, a few of the more adventurous northern people have found use for the froth.  In particular, some froths seemed to be infected with what has become known as Froth Blight, where the froth turns a black-blue colour and secretes a milky brown liquid.  This froth blight kills the froth, rendering it harmless.  It is unknown how this blight is spread from one froth to another, or how the froth contracts it.  The thick liquid that oozes from it can then be used as an unguent.  If applied to the skin, it acts as a repellent.  It is said that the Snowflakes will not land on a person who is suitably swathed in the liquid.  Of course, this is so far unconfirmed, as direct evidence of this working has yet to be substantiated.  It seems that there is a drought of willing participants when it comes to testing this salve. (He, he! I really like this detail. Even the most horrible monster needs a weak point. Actually, especially  the most horrible monster needs one. Incidentally, I hope that if the Destiny party ever makes it that far north, we’ll get supplied with some froth blight unguent?)

Myth/Lore

The mythical hero Uraghadze is a favourite subject of Ice Tribe mythology.  There is a story related of how Uraghadze had an encounter with a snowflake froth.  As with most Uraghadze myths, it does not seem to be a morality tale, nor an allagorical one.  Instead, it simply illustrates the Ice Tribes’ belief that the strength of man can overcome the forces of nature.  Many times this includes the help of one or more of the gods, and sometimes it is in spite of these deity's intervention. (Maybe say: “Many Ice Tribe myths tell how one or several gods help man in this endeavour, although in some stories the gods appear as man’s adversaries.”) This myth (The grammatic reference ['This'] has been lost, so I suggest you say: “The tale of Uraghadze …”) has been told for generations, and seems to be of Remusian origin, even though the hero himself seems to be of indeterminate origin.


(I believe you need a title here.)

In the before time, when gods walked the world with men, the hero Uraghadze Hanno-eck-Icsain, Uraghadze Ice-Hand, had many adventures.  Now it happened that one spring, after a very long and cold winter, his clan was short on meat.  Uraghadze decided to go off in search of game.  He travelled to the Gathorn Mountains, where prey was more plentiful.  Once there, it did not take long before he came across the track of a Tar’andus deer.  Gripping his spear tighter in anticipation of a fruitful hunt, Uraghadze set off after the animal.

Now, as much as Uraghadze was loved and revered by his clan, he had garnerred the ire of a number of the gods.  In particular, Necteref hated the hero for killing his animal companion, Caracal.  Necteref too was in the mountains that day, and he did spy the hero on his hunt, and decided to make mischief on him.

Uraghadze trudged on through the mountains, further and further, lured by a great Tar'andus buck, with a rack greater than Uraghadze had ever seen before.  His heart beat strongly in his chest, as he imagined the amount of meat this magnificent creature would bring.  Onward he ventured, each time only catching a glimpse of the buck as it trotted over the next ridge.

The Tar'andus buck was no other than Necteref, leading the hero further and further away.  The god had a plan, as dark and evil as there ever had been.  Necteref knew that within the Gathorn Mountains, there existed a creature so foul, so dangerous, that the hero would not be able to save himself through strength alone, nor with cunning.  The god was leading Uraghadze toward a froth of Fisah-eck-Shanno, the Snowflake insects.

For five days and five nights, Uraghadze chased the buck, always just out of range to throw his spear.  On the sixth day, Uraghadze stopped, his body aching from the effort; his belly crying out for food; his hands and feet numb from the cold.  He sank to his knees, and and tilted back his head, letting forth a howl of rage that shook the very mountains themselves.  He had failed his people, and now they would die without the food the buck would have brought.

As he knelt there, tears streaming down his face, forming a trail of ice along his cheek, he saw with wonder the buck approaching him.  Uraghadze tried to heft his giant spear, but his strength was gone and he could not.  Then, as he watched helplessly, the buck stood up on its hind legs.  The great rack that Uraghadze had so wanted to take as a trophy, seemed to melt away, and the front legs became hands.  The buck's face then transformed, and the true form of Necteref was revealed to the hero.

"Why?  Why have you deceived me so my people shall die of hunger?"

"Your crime is arrogance, Uraghadze.  Arrogance in thinking that you are equal to a god; arrogance in thinking that you could challenge and kill Caracal without incurring my wrath; and arrogance in thinking that Nechya, the mother of your kind, will always be there to help you.  For this crime, the punishment is death."

To the hero's horror, he saw that Necteref was standing near a small alicott bush, of which a large froth had hardened around its base.  Now it started to tremble, and soon it began to crack and split.  First one, then another and another (no comma) of small white insects emerged from the brown coloured froth.  Some began to roll and crawl across the snowtop, heading toward Uraghadze, while others expanded and were picked up on the wind that came from Necteref as he blew them toward the mortal.

(I've a consideration to offer: if this myth is also going to be put into the library as part of the Hiveling-myth-book (which I hope it will be!), then the reader who has not read the Snowflake entry may not be able to appreciate the full terror of Uraghadze's situation at this point. Now, you may want it that way, i.e. you may want to assume the reader's knowledge. But if you don't, you could add something like:

"Uraghadze knew that these insects were Fisah-eck-Shannon - creatures as small as they were deadly, who would bite into his skin, burrow into his flesh, and infests it with maggots who would eat his living body from the inside until nothing but bones and hair would be left."

Uraghadze tried to run, but his legs would not obey him, and he could not move.  As he knelt in the snow, he lifted his chin proudly and faced the vengeful god before him.  "Then I die, but I die a man!  I die a child of Nechya, having lived with her grace, and it is my honour to do so."

A smile crossed the face of the god, and he looked upon the mortal with contempt.  "Yes, you will die, human.  Alone, cold, and in much pain."  The image of the god then transformed once more to the shape of the buck.  It then turned and bounded easily through the snow and far away.

Uraghadze watched the buck disappear, then looked at the approaching terror; resigned to his fate.  As the first insects neared him, so that he closed his eyes and awaited their painful burrowing into his flesh, he was surprised when it did not come.  He opened his eyes again, and watched in wonder as the insects nearest him stopped their advance.

Like an eddy in a body of water, the snowflakes began to travel in a slow wide circle, slowing traveling inward, tighter and tighter, faster and faster.  Not only the insects on the ground, but those in the air as well, as if blown by a strange wind.  More and more snowflakes gathered, slowing taking shape; slowing getting larger.  Insect against insect; one atop the next, it built upon itself, becoming a mysterious entity.  

Thousands of Fisah-eck-Shanno came together, more than Uraghadze could count; more than there are stars in the night sky.  Slowly they transformed from many small insects to one large creature; its flesh a trembling mass of snowflakes.  This new creature took a shape, and that shape was a woman.  Although its face had no eyes that were real, no mouth that was real, nor any other feature that a face should have, Uraghadze recognized that very face.  It was the goddess Nechya.

Muted, silent, it stared at him with ethereal eyes, its head cocked to one side.  How it was able to stare at him withut real eyes, but simply a hole in the writhing mass on snowflakes, cannot be guessed at by mortal minds.  But stare it did, and its mouthed seemed to move as if speaking, but no sound came forth.

Uraghadze could not help but feel a shiver course through him, for he knew he was witnessing the power of the gods; the power of Nechya herself!  Using his spear as a support, he pulled himself to his feet, feeling strength return to him, as if he drew on the power of the goddess.

The creature, the entity, the goddess, for how does one describe such a being, then lifted an arm and pointed.  Insects swarmed about the limb, causing it to form, dissolve, then reform again many times over and over.  It was solid, and as smoke all at once.  Real and nightmare.

Uraghadze understood.  He was to leave; to get as far from there as he could.  Leaning heavily on his spear, he hurried away, looking over his shoulder often to see if the creature would follow, but it did not.  Rather, it stood motionless, yet constantly moving, its arm outstretched in its invocation.  Then, all at once, the creature collapsed in a grand display of swarming Fisah-eck-Shanno.  But Uraghadze was safe; far from the white terror.

The hero made his way back.  Down from the mighty Gathorn Mountains, back to the empty flatness of the Frozen Wastes he walked.  Though he lived, spared by the mercy of the goddess Nechya, his heart was heavy, for he returned with no meat.  How many of his people would die without the food he was to bring?  He had failed them.

Suddenly, as his clan came into view, there stood before him a majestic deer, its antlers twice the size of the rack he had seen on the buck that was Necteref.  This meat would save his people, feeding them for a long time.  Taking aim, Uraghadze threw his spear with all his strength.  His aim was true, and the Tar'andus buck was felled.

As he picked up the carcass and threw it over his shoulders to carry home, he looked to the sky, and gave his thanks to the great mother, Nechya.

***Extra comments on the myth, repeated from the Hiveling myths thread, where they got lost among other posts:

I found two (possible) typos:

Quote
Like an eddy in a body of water, the snowflakes began to travel in a slow wide circle, slowing traveling inward, tighter and tighter, faster and faster.  Not only the insects on the ground, but those in the air as well, as if blown by a strange wind.  More and more snowflakes gathered, slowing taking shape; slowing getting larger.  Insect against insect; one atop the next, it built upon itself, becoming a mysterious entity.

Should the red words be "slowly"?

Quote
Muted, silent, it stared at him with ethereal eyes, its head cocked to one side.  How it was able to stare at him withut real eyes, but simply a hole in the writhing mass on snowflakes, cannot be guessed at by mortal minds.

... without ...
« Last Edit: 02 October 2009, 08:11:48 by Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang » Logged

The greatest danger in life is that you may take too many precautions.
Ding-dong!
Azhira Styralias
Santh. Member
***

Gained Aura: 132
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2.774


Mód’dél’áey


View Profile
« Reply #47 on: 02 October 2009, 09:44:51 »

EWWWW!!!

GROOOOSSSSS!!!!

AAAACK!!

Spider Snowflakes!!!


Maggot DEATH!!

 jawdrop

Can I have them for Caael'heroth? Pretty please?
Logged

No, I would not want to live in a world without dragons, as I would not want to live in a world without magic, for that is a world without mystery, and that is a world without faith. And that, I fear, for any reasoning, conscious being, would be the cruelest trick of all.
Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin
Santh. Member
***

Gained Aura: 144
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2.416


The Remusian


View Profile
« Reply #48 on: 03 October 2009, 14:24:17 »

Thank you for the thorough check Shabby. :)  I have made the requisite changes.  A few of your comments I have answered here.  You were Auried for your efforts.

(Why would earlier metamorphosis provide you with a greater number of legs? Am I missing something?) It is a hypothesis, which could easily be mistaken with the level of scientific research here.  To a medieval mind, early metamorphasis would mean more time to grow more legs.  Hope that suffices. :D

(Hm. Can Santharian researchers really discern the teeth of a creature so small? Wouldn’t you need a microscope?) I'm gonna assume a large magnifying glass could work, but I'll leave this one open for a bit and if the coonsensus is no, then I will remove the reference.

A large sucker like a mouth is ...  I placed a hyphen in sucker-like instead of putting in the "a"

So you can escape them, if you go upwind of them?  Yes, because they have no method of powered flight.  They simply float in the breeze.


Azhira, if you want them there, we could spread these little beasties across the north.  They are suitably rare enough to not destroy any ecological balance.  I know Talia wanted the area spread out a bit more.  Just let me know what you think would be a realistic zone and we can adjust the territory. :D
Logged

"Lather...Rinse...Repeat"   Why has God made my life so complicated?

This is what I'm working on
Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang
Santh. Member
***

Gained Aura: 192
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1.318



View Profile
« Reply #49 on: 04 October 2009, 23:10:51 »

Hi Alt,

Looks good, this!

I noticed that I introduced a typo into your work with the passage that I suggested for the myth, and which you kindly chose to adopt:
Quote
Uraghadze knew that these insects were Fisah-eck-Shannon

... "Shanno", I think. Don't know where I got the additional "n" from.

Genuine question: do Remusians have magnifying glasses? Or did a Southerner come up North to research the snowflakes? Anyway, my personal preference for vague, mythical descriptions should in no way bar you from reporting the small, difficult-to-see and, frankly, terrifying details of your creatures' anatomy.  :)

Great work, Altario!

Shabakuk

Logged

The greatest danger in life is that you may take too many precautions.
Ding-dong!
Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin
Santh. Member
***

Gained Aura: 144
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2.416


The Remusian


View Profile
« Reply #50 on: 04 October 2009, 23:34:35 »

See that's what I get for being lazy and simply C&P your suggestion instead of retyping it out. buck

As far as the Remusian's go themselves, I would say no to the magnifying glasses.  But, as there have been multiple Remusian researchers mentioned in other entries, I'm going to suggest that one of them might, seeing as they have had contact with the Santharian scientific community.
Logged

"Lather...Rinse...Repeat"   Why has God made my life so complicated?

This is what I'm working on
Decipher Ziron
Moderator
****

Gained Aura: 55
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2.574


General Genius of Remarkable Modesty


View Profile
« Reply #51 on: 23 October 2009, 21:21:21 »

Something's happening!

A moderator appears!




Deep within the heart of the Gathorn Mountains (of where? Specifics are much use to foreign types like myself :D) can be found a strange insect.  Called the Fisah-eck-Shanno by the Remusians, which means Snowflake, it causes terror in the hearts of those who are unlucky enough to come across it.  Beautiful, yet repulsive at the same time, it may be the last thing one ever sees before a painful death.

         Appearance
This insect is about two nailsbreadth across.  By far, the majority of this measurement is taken up by its legs, as the body is often not much bigger than the head of a nail.  In adulthood, it appears like a cross between a white fluffy spider and, when aloft, a large snowflake; hence its name.  Two small pink to red eyes can be seen on its bulbous body, if one looks closely enough.  This body is round and furry, and has six to eight legs protruding from it, apparently in every direction.  It is unknown as to why individual insects have a different number of legs.  It has been suggested that Snowflakes may occasionally lose a leg or two in the froth, the hard shelled protective ball that the larval insects mature. Other scholars surmise that maybe it is because some of the maggots complete their metamorphosis at different times, and that insects with eight legs simply changed earlier than those with six.  On the Snowflake’s underside a hollow proboscis juts out; it is white, with a grayish black hard chitinous point, and is used for injecting into a host.

In the larvae stage, the Snowflake has a milky grey body, and resembles a maggot of a few grains in length.  Tiny black feet can be seen, which it uses to move itself along.  A large sucker-like mouth is at the one end, and if one looks close enough, a row of tiny sharp teeth can be observed.
       
         Special Abilities
In winter, when these creatures mature, they can fill their bodies up with air, like a balloon, and can be carried on the wind, searching for their prey, and a place to lay their eggs.  If there is no wind, the snowflakes will simply crawl along the ground on their own legs.  They can cover a distance of a ped in roughly 15-20 blinks, thus moving on the wind is usually much faster for them, and as such, makes them deadlier. By contrast, how fast do they move in the wind?

They are also quite resistant to the cold, and can survive the coldest of northern winters. (How cold does it drop to? We do have the perik scale now!)  It is true that fewer froths (Whats a froth?) are disturbed in winter, but it does happen.  Scholars are unsure why they remain active in winter, and some have surmised that it is because of the antifreezing effects of the hrugchuk grass, that is eaten by many of the victims of the Fisah-eck-Shanno.

         Territory
These creatures can be found in the Gathorn Mountains, and as far south as the Heaths of Wilderon (Again, continent, region specifications etc.) .  There have been reports of them outside of this area, but these reports are rare, and largely unconfirmed.  It is thought that the Snowflake's short lifespan (how short?) prevents much migration of the species.
   
         Habitat/Behavior
Larval snowflakes gather in what’s called a froth.  Hundreds, if not thousands, of these small maggot-like insects gather in a ball, each producing a sticky substance that bubbles and covers the entire froth.  This sickly light brown secretion then hardens, forming a protective shell around the maggots.  This hardened shell protects the maggots until conditions are right for it to transform.  Some think that this condition is based on weather, for spring is when most of these froths awaken.  Still others surmise that it is the proximity of a host, as froths can break open at any time of the year.

Regardless of what brings on the awakening, the hard shell of the froth cracks, then the mature snowflakes emerge; hundreds of them.  It is at this point that they become deadly.  These adult snowflake crawl, or roll, along on their new long legs.  As they do, their bodies swell, filling with air.  If there is a breeze, many of them will be lifted into the air, where they float seemingly weightless in the winds.  It is this sight that got them their name.

Any animal or, gods forbid, man that finds themselves in the path of these creatures is in dire straits at best.  The Snowflakes legs are quite adept at grabbing onto hair, thread, fur, etc.  Once attached to a host, the snowflake injects eggs into the skin.  It takes only a moment of time for this to happen, as it seems the snowflake is released from the froth already carrying viable eggs.  Many eggs can be injected into the skin from the snowflake at once, though they are too small to be seen clearly enough to know how many.

It takes only a few minutes before the area around the eggs becomes inflamed.  Within an hour, the eggs begin to hatch into maggots of less than a grain in length.  These maggots are voracious eaters and begin to burrow into the flesh deeper.  Within a day, the host is usually dead.  A couple days after that, a man sized host will be devoured completely, with nothing left but the bones.

The maggots will then travel together, looking for a suitable place to hide, usually under logs, boulders, hollows of trees, even in the crook of tree branches.  They will begin then to gather in a tight ball, once more secreting the sticky fluid and forming a froth.

You previously mention it is theorised that they can survive winter because of the antifreezing qualities of some sort of grass. Does this mean that say if I was to get in their path I would be eaten, but if this occurred in winter, the parasites inside me would just die off because they cant harvest any of my antifreeze bodily fluids (by virtue of not having any)?

I would suggest an additional alternative explanation as to how these things survive the bitter temperatures.


         Diet
Larval snowflakes feed on nearly anything, from the flesh of their host, to vegetable matter and carrion.  They are voracious eaters, eating several times their own weight in a relatively short amount of time.

As adults, it does not appear that they eat.  If these creatures do not find a host in which to lay their eggs, they appear to die within a day or two.  It is this fact alone that keeps the snowflake population from growing completely out of control.  If they do find a host, it seems that the energy expended in laying the eggs leaves the Fisah-eck-Shanno nearly dead.  Within a few hours at most, the creature will die.

         Mating
There does not seem to be any mating ritual between individual snowflakes.  In fact, there do not seem to be any sexes at all, within the snowflake species.  All snowflakes seem capable of laying eggs, which do not need fertilization.  The snowflakes emerge from the froth able to lay eggs immediately.  Also, the maggots can lay eggs once they are implanted in a host.  Within a day, as they devour the flesh, more maggots will be born. (Maybe you could theorise that there is some sort of male in the froths that fertilise them, and when all the maggots are egg-ready...thats when the froth opens? Just a silly Nybelmarian idea...take no notice!)

Usages
There is no known use for adult Snowflakes.  However, a few of the more adventurous northern people have found use for the froth.  In particular, some froths seemed to be infected with what has become known as Froth Blight, where the froth turns a black-blue colour and secretes a milky brown liquid.  This froth blight kills the froth, rendering it harmless.  It is unknown how this blight is spread from one froth to another, or how the froth contracts it.  The thick liquid that oozes from it can then be used as an unguent.  If applied to the skin, it acts as a repellent.  It is said that the Snowflakes will not land on a person who is suitably swathed in the liquid.  Of course, this is so far unconfirmed, as direct evidence of this working has yet to be substantiated.  It seems that there is a drought of willing participants when it comes to testing this salve.

Myth/Lore

The mythical hero Uraghadze is a favourite subject of Ice Tribe mythology.  There is a story related of how Uraghadze had an encounter with a snowflake froth.  As with most Uraghadze myths, it does not seem to be a morality tale, nor an allagorical one.  Instead, it simply illustrates the Ice Tribes’ belief that the strength of man can overcome the forces of nature.  Many times this includes the help of one or more of the gods, and sometimes it is in spite of these deity's intervention.  The tale of Uraghadze has been told for generations, and seems to be of Remusian origin, even though the hero himself seems to be of indeterminate origin.

The Trial of Uraghadze

In the before time, when gods walked the world with men, the hero Uraghadze Hanno-eck-Icsain, Uraghadze Ice-Hand, had many adventures.  Now it happened that one spring, after a very long and cold winter, his clan was short on meat.  Uraghadze decided to go off in search of game.  He travelled to the Gathorn Mountains, where prey was more plentiful.  Once there, it did not take long before he came across the track of a Tar’andus deer.  Gripping his spear tighter in anticipation of a fruitful hunt, Uraghadze set off after the animal.

Now, as much as Uraghadze was loved and revered by his clan, he had garnerred the ire of a number of the gods.  In particular, Necteref hated the hero for killing his animal companion, Caracal.  Necteref too was in the mountains that day, and he did spy the hero on his hunt, and decided to make mischief on him.

Uraghadze trudged on through the mountains, further and further, lured by a great Tar'andus buck, with a rack greater than Uraghadze had ever seen before.  His heart beat strongly in his chest, as he imagined the amount of meat this magnificent creature would bring.  Onward he ventured, each time only catching a glimpse of the buck as it trotted over the next ridge.

The Tar'andus buck was no other than Necteref, leading the hero further and further away.  The god had a plan, as dark and evil as there ever had been.  Necteref knew that within the Gathorn Mountains, there existed a creature so foul, so dangerous, that the hero would not be able to save himself through strength alone, nor with cunning.  The god was leading Uraghadze toward a froth of Fisah-eck-Shanno, the Snowflake insects.

For five days and five nights, Uraghadze chased the buck, always just out of range to throw his spear.  On the sixth day, Uraghadze stopped, his body aching from the effort; his belly crying out for food; his hands and feet numb from the cold.  He sank to his knees, and tilted back his head, letting forth a howl of rage that shook the very mountains themselves.  He had failed his people, and now they would die without the food the buck would have brought.

As he knelt there, tears streaming down his face, forming a trail of ice along his cheek, he saw with wonder the buck approaching him.  Uraghadze tried to heft his giant spear, but his strength was gone and he could not.  Then, as he watched helplessly, the buck stood up on its hind legs.  The great rack that Uraghadze had so wanted to take as a trophy, seemed to melt away, and the front legs became hands.  The buck's face then transformed, and the true form of Necteref was revealed to the hero.

"Why?  Why have you deceived me so my people shall die of hunger?"

"Your crime is arrogance, Uraghadze.  Arrogance in thinking that you are equal to a god; arrogance in thinking that you could challenge and kill Caracal without incurring my wrath; and arrogance in thinking that Nechya, the mother of your kind, will always be there to help you.  For this crime, the punishment is death."

To the hero's horror, he saw that Necteref was standing near a small alicott bush, of which a large froth had hardened around its base.  Now it started to tremble, and soon it began to crack and split.  First one, then another and another of small white insects emerged from the brown coloured froth.  Some began to roll and crawl across the snowtop, heading toward Uraghadze, while others expanded and were picked up on the wind that came from Necteref as he blew them toward the mortal.

Uraghadze knew that these insects were Fisah-eck-Shanno - creatures as small as they were deadly, who would bite into his skin, burrow into his flesh, and infests it with maggots who would eat his living body from the inside until nothing but bones and hair would be left.

Uraghadze tried to run, but his legs would not obey him, and he could not move.  As he knelt in the snow, he lifted his chin proudly and faced the vengeful god before him.  "Then I die, but I die a man!  I die a child of Nechya, having lived with her grace, and it is my honour to do so."

A smile crossed the face of the god, and he looked upon the mortal with contempt.  "Yes, you will die, human.  Alone, cold, and in much pain."  The image of the god then transformed once more to the shape of the buck.  It then turned and bounded easily through the snow and far away.

Uraghadze watched the buck disappear, then looked at the approaching terror; resigned to his fate.  As the first insects neared him, so that he closed his eyes and awaited their painful burrowing into his flesh, he was surprised when it did not come.  He opened his eyes again, and watched in wonder as the insects nearest him stopped their advance.

Like an eddy in a body of water, the snowflakes began to travel in a slow wide circle, slowly traveling inward, tighter and tighter, faster and faster.  Not only the insects on the ground, but those in the air as well, as if blown by a strange wind.  More and more snowflakes gathered, slowly taking shape; slowly getting larger.  Insect against insect; one atop the next, it built upon itself, becoming a mysterious entity. 

Thousands of Fisah-eck-Shanno came together, more than Uraghadze could count; more than there are stars in the night sky.  Slowly they transformed from many small insects to one large creature; its flesh a trembling mass of snowflakes.  This new creature took a shape, and that shape was a woman.  Although its face had no eyes that were real, no mouth that was real, nor any other feature that a face should have, Uraghadze recognized that very face.  It was the goddess Nechya.

Muted, silent, it stared at him with ethereal eyes, its head cocked to one side.  How it was able to stare at him without real eyes, but simply a hole in the writhing mass on snowflakes, cannot be guessed at by mortal minds.  But stare it did, and its mouthed seemed to move as if speaking, but no sound came forth.

Uraghadze could not help but feel a shiver course through him, for he knew he was witnessing the power of the gods; the power of Nechya herself!  Using his spear as a support, he pulled himself to his feet, feeling strength return to him, as if he drew on the power of the goddess.

The creature, the entity, the goddess, for how does one describe such a being, then lifted an arm and pointed.  Insects swarmed about the limb, causing it to form, dissolve, then reform again many times over and over.  It was solid, and as smoke all at once.  Real and nightmare.

Uraghadze understood.  He was to leave; to get as far from there as he could.  Leaning heavily on his spear, he hurried away, looking over his shoulder often to see if the creature would follow, but it did not.  Rather, it stood motionless, yet constantly moving, its arm outstretched in its invocation.  Then, all at once, the creature collapsed in a grand display of swarming Fisah-eck-Shanno.  But Uraghadze was safe; far from the white terror.

The hero made his way back.  Down from the mighty Gathorn Mountains, back to the empty flatness of the Frozen Wastes he walked.  Though he lived, spared by the mercy of the goddess Nechya, his heart was heavy, for he returned with no meat.  How many of his people would die without the food he was to bring?  He had failed them.

Suddenly, as his clan came into view, there stood before him a majestic deer, its antlers twice the size of the rack he had seen on the buck that was Necteref.  This meat would save his people, feeding them for a long time.  Taking aim, Uraghadze threw his spear with all his strength.  His aim was true, and the Tar'andus buck was felled.

As he picked up the carcass and threw it over his shoulders to carry home, he looked to the sky, and gave his thanks to the great mother, Nechya.



Very nice Altario!

I like the idea it is very well executed with a creative yet scholarly flair.

If you just amend these few problemos I'll give you a blarrow for this!

Well done

Deci
Logged

Laugh ,and the World Laughs with you.

Weep, and you weep alone.
Artimidor Federkiel
Administrator
*****

Gained Aura: 538
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 23.091



View Profile Homepage
« Reply #52 on: 30 October 2009, 05:10:57 »

Alt? Final fixes? Collecting stuff for the update...
Logged



"Between the mind that plans and the hands that build there must be a mediator, and this must be the heart." -- Maria (Metropolis)
Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin
Santh. Member
***

Gained Aura: 144
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2.416


The Remusian


View Profile
« Reply #53 on: 30 October 2009, 07:24:26 »

I was working on it today. :)  I'll have it ready by tomorrow night.
« Last Edit: 30 October 2009, 07:36:56 by Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin » Logged

"Lather...Rinse...Repeat"   Why has God made my life so complicated?

This is what I'm working on
Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin
Santh. Member
***

Gained Aura: 144
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2.416


The Remusian


View Profile
« Reply #54 on: 31 October 2009, 02:33:52 »

@Deci:

Comments edited.

Stuff I have not edited:

By contrast, how fast do they move in the wind?  Kind of a hard question to answer, as that would depend on the wind.  Obviously these creatures would travel much faster in a strong wind than a slight breeze.  As such, putting a quantified number here would only be innacurate at best.

(How cold does it drop to? We do have the perik scale now!)  Seeing as the geographic area has not been done yet, and neither has the climate map been agreed to officially, I would rather not put temperatures into this particular entry, so to not step on toes of those wortking on these entries, as well as to not set precedent before these other entries are finalized.

You previously mention it is theorised that they can survive winter because of the antifreezing qualities of some sort of grass. Does this mean that say if I was to get in their path I would be eaten, but if this occurred in winter, the parasites inside me would just die off because they cant harvest any of my antifreeze bodily fluids (by virtue of not having any)?

I would suggest an additional alternative explanation as to how these things survive the bitter temperatures.
 In the theory, it was stated that many victims eat the hrugchuk grass, not all of them, so it is not a straight one to one corelation.  Many animals it feeds oin are carnivorous, thus do not eat the grass directly.  But, enough of the direct grass consumers are eaten that the effects can sustain the population until the next time it eats one.  Kind of like I need Vitamin C to survive, but not every meal I eat contains an orange. buck


(Maybe you could theorise that there is some sort of male in the froths that fertilise them, and when all the maggots are egg-ready...thats when the froth opens? Just a silly Nybelmarian idea...take no notice!  My initial concept of these creatures was that of a sexless bug, and I am hoping to keep it that way.

Of course this, and any other changes that you may demand changes to, I will comply.  I am just setting forth my reasoning for not doing so at this time.  Let me know if there are one or more of these that you want to insist upon, and I'll change it.  Though I may not get done in time for this update.

Thank you Deci for the perusal and work on this, :)  You were auried for your efforts.
« Last Edit: 31 October 2009, 02:35:34 by Altario Shialt-eck-Gorrin » Logged

"Lather...Rinse...Repeat"   Why has God made my life so complicated?

This is what I'm working on
Decipher Ziron
Moderator
****

Gained Aura: 55
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2.574


General Genius of Remarkable Modesty


View Profile
« Reply #55 on: 31 October 2009, 04:48:18 »

Your explanations for non-integration are perfectly acceptable and for the most part they were suggestions, there was nothing 'wrong' with the entry grin

Thanks for the Aura

And I think this deserves a blarrow....Lets just hope Art spots it for the update eh?

Deci  grin
Logged

Laugh ,and the World Laughs with you.

Weep, and you weep alone.
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]
Print
Jump to:  

Recent
[27 March 2019, 00:01:57]

[21 June 2018, 14:28:00]

[31 May 2017, 06:35:55]

[06 May 2017, 05:27:04]

[03 April 2017, 01:15:03]

[26 March 2017, 12:48:25]

[15 March 2017, 02:23:07]

[15 March 2017, 02:20:28]

[15 March 2017, 02:17:52]

[14 March 2017, 20:23:43]

[06 February 2017, 04:53:35]

[31 January 2017, 08:45:52]

[15 December 2016, 15:50:49]

[26 November 2016, 23:16:38]

[27 October 2016, 07:42:01]

[27 September 2016, 18:51:05]

[11 September 2016, 23:17:33]

[11 September 2016, 23:15:27]

[11 September 2016, 22:58:56]

[03 September 2016, 22:22:23]
Members
Total Members: 1019
Latest: lolanixon
Stats
Total Posts: 144590
Total Topics: 11052
Online Today: 29
Online Ever: 700
(23 January 2020, 20:05:39)
Users Online
Users: 0
Guests: 32
Total: 32

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2005, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Theme based on Cerberus with Risen adjustments by Bloc and Krelia
Modified By Artimidor for The Santharian Dream
gfx
gfxgfx gfxgfx