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Author Topic: Pin's Point and other Findings  (Read 8018 times)
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Valan Nonesuch
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« on: 22 January 2012, 04:37:21 »

Name:
Finding Charm (Pin's Point, Dowsing Rod, Searchers' Stew, Under Sky Or In The Ground)

Coven:
Needle Witches, Chisel Witches, Cauldron Witches, Rhyme Witches

Spell Level:
Witchling

Overview
A simple charm familiar to many witches is the Finding. While the means of effecting such a charm and its limitations differ between covens, the end result is the same. A Finding charm directs the user towards a person, object or place.

Spell Effect
A Finding will draw a person, typically the witch who has crafted it, towards whatever it is meant to seek. It does not tend to do so directly, in many cases. The path a Finding shows is rarely straight-forward, and based on the skill of the witch may not hone in exactly on the target but will merely lead near to it. Findings may be used to find living things, people or animals, inanimate objects ranging from lost jewellery to ore to fertile soil.

Crafting Procedure
Needle Witches create a pin-bauble, a collection of thread and scraps of fabric or yarn sewn or knit into a pouch around an object. If the witch wishes to find a person for instance, she may use a lock of hair, a well worn piece of clothing or an item of personal significance, and craft the pin-bauble around that. Once completed, the bauble is transfixed with a pin or needle and hung from a length of string. Pin-baubles excel at finding people or animals, but falter when presented with less animate subjects.

A Chisel Witch carves a familiar forked dowsing rod. The rod is shaped like a Y, and employed with either hand on the shorter lengths of the fork, and the remaining long section of the branch pointed away from the witch. A branch must be selected, and then carved, smoothed and polished in order to function. Finally, the witch must give the dowsing rod a "scent", often accomplished by including some fragment of the object to be found in the polishing wax, be it soil, iron filings, or spring water. Dowsing rods tend to excel at finding natural things, related to the tree itself, be it good earth for plants, water to dig a well, or indeed ores, but tend to do poorly when tasked with finding animals or people.

The Rhyme Witch's method of casting is among the simplest, and some claim the weakest. The short chant may even be familiar to some, and must be repeated while turning in a circle with one's arm outstretched holding a pendulum.

Turning, turning, turn around
something's lost what must be found
Turning, turning, turn around
under sky or in the ground
Turning, turning, turn about
find it, find it, search it out!

It is said that a Rhyme Witch's finding has very little range, when compared to other Findings, hence the necessity to work this particular charm in repetition. This finding is, however, notable in that it does not require a scent. A Rhyme Finding may be worked with merely the name of the thing to be sought, which is typically inserted in the second verse of the rhyme, and the final verse may be amended for gender or numbers as a result. This does lead to complications for while one may easily search for Kel or Noric, searching for "sheep" or "goat" may cause the search to end at the nearest pasture, rather than where it is intended.

While other methods of casting a finding exist, among the most bizarre is that of the Cauldron Witches, who brew a particularly noxious stew, said to include such diverse and inedible materials as filings from a compass, flittermouse eyes and powdered sunflowers, in addition to the element that needs to be found. The "Searching Stew" requires that this last component be liquid or somehow liquefied in order to be consumed.

When consumed, the searcher (typically the witch, as few are willing to consume the stew) feels a pull from the gut towards the object of the finding. Needless to say this particular finding lasts only as long as the stew stays in the belly (which may be passing short, depending on the gastronomic fortitude of the imbiber) and will end if the contents of the stomach should be voided.

Materials

Any form of Finding requires a focus, in order to direct the charm. A pin-bauble may utilize a personal effect such as a comb, favoured piece of jewellery or indeed, a well-worn sock, alongside the more typical lock of hair, tooth or a splash of blood. The container for this object is made of loose threads and scraps of fabric, or odd ends of yarn, which is then transfixed with a long needle or pin. This pin then orients itself (and the rest of the bauble) towards the object. Some disagreement is had over what to use for this focus; some witches may craft the pin-bauble and use any stray pin, up to and including a hair pin, knitting needle or errant tooth pick, while others claim that the needle or pin used to sew or knit the bauble together improves the potency of the spell.

The dowsing rod varies from witch to witch, based purely on the wood used. Some witches swear by dowsing rods made from the soft, pliable wood of a willow branch, while others prefer fragrans, meldrapple, malus, pine or even a twig from a redberry bush. What is agreed upon is that soft woods make for the best rods, though they are often the most difficult to carve. The branch chosen is often forked in some way and traditionally takes the shape of a Y. The chosen is carefully removed from the tree, cut and then whittled and smoothed, before finally being polished. The polishing process also includes "scenting" the rod with a small sample of what it is meant to find, similar to giving a hound a scent to follow. This varies wildly but common "scents" are iron fillings, gold flakes or dust, spring water.
Some witches opt to use a single dowsing rod several times (perhaps owing to certain difficulties in crafting) simply covering one scent with a new one. While this generally works, the rod can become "confused" if too many scents are added to it and will eventually become useless.

Rhyming Findings require a pendant, often this is a simple piece of jewellery but may be nothing more than a smooth stone or piece of polished wood with a hole bored through it. It is important that the pendant be worked, or altered in some way by the witch in order to function. The pendant is held in an outstretched arm and sways in the direction of the object of the search. Rhyming Findings also require the name of the subject. The more unique this name is, the better. Searching for Jakor may find everyone by that name, while searching for Jakor Overhill would be more precise.

Searching Stew requires a cauldron, kettle or other form of pot to brew the spell in. The exact making varies, as some will attempt to make the stew more palatable than others. What is known is that the main ingredients of the stew are rarely pleasant. Dogs' noses, bits of flittermouth or owl are included to help in the searching. Fillings from a compass are included, for the same reason, though special attention is paid not to include lodestone in stew for it ruins the mixture and draws the wrong threads.

Crafting Time
The crafting time of focus for a Finding varies based on the skill of the witch working at it. A novice who can't stop pricking her thumb with a needle will take much longer to sew a pin-bauble than a practised needle witch.

Duration

A Finding lasts as long as the witch continues to attempt it. So long as the witch continues to work the finding, her charm will continue to direct her towards its target.

Range and power

A Finding is only as good as the witch that has crafted it, though generally, there is something to be said of the quality and relative freshness of the materials, particularly in the case of finding something living.

Counterspells, defences, immunities

Animals that travel in herds are much harder to pinpoint individually. A finding may simply direct the witch to the nearest flock of sheep, rather than a single lost member of the flock. It is said that carrying a piece of lodestone makes it harder to pinpoint an individual. Some sell charms or coins made out of lodestone for just such a purpose, otherwise it may be worked into inconspicuous jewellery. Attempts to find lodestone have almost always lead to the witch finding herself walking in circles. Likewise, quicksilver and cinnabar are also notorious for throwing off Findings.
« Last Edit: 02 September 2012, 16:33:32 by Artimidor Federkiel » Logged

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Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang
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« Reply #1 on: 23 January 2012, 23:17:00 »

Hey Valan,

Excellent idea! I love the idea of chisel witches making a dowsing rod, like the idea of "scenting" the rod - and as far as the pin-bauble goes: the "well-worn sock" is a nice touch!  :D

You're still working on this, so I won't comment in too much detail. Just to say one thing, since it really affects the heart of the witchcraft idea:

Quote
Duration

A Finding lasts as long as the focus of the witch using it. So long as the witch continues to use their focus, her charm will continue to direct her towards it's target.

"Focus", in this sense, is a Ximaxian idea. The witchcraft counterpart is "trance". So the witch executing this spell wouldn't look like a serene philosopher, meditating on the forces at work between pin bauble and target. Instead, as she walks toward the target, she might be seen swinging her pin bauble, or holding her dowsing rod, her eyeballs turned to reveal only the whites in her eyes, not seeing anything but the dream thread leading her to her target. She might also babble away unintelligible syllables, maybe imitating the cries of the animal she seeks, maybe speaking in the tongue of the person she seeks, etc. (Although more experienced witches may be able to preserve some awareness of the surroundings ...)

Witchcraft is not about "concentration", like Ximaxian magic. It's about trance, ecstasy: losing one's mind to enable visions of invisible things.

As for spell names:

I like "Pin's Point" for the needle witches. As for the Chisel variation, I found the term "wiggle stick" in a dictionary - I think that sounds like fun?

Anyway, I'm immensely pleased that this witchy thing is catching on!

Shabakuk
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« Reply #2 on: 23 January 2012, 23:21:11 »

Quote
"Focus", in this sense, is a Ximaxian idea. The witchcraft counterpart is "trance". So the witch executing this spell wouldn't look like a serene philosopher, meditating on the forces at work between pin bauble and target. Instead, as she walks toward the target, she might be seen swinging her pin bauble, or holding her dowsing rod, her eyeballs turned to reveal only the whites in her eyes, not seeing anything but the dream thread leading her to her target. She might also babble away unintelligible syllables, maybe imitating the cries of the animal she seeks, maybe speaking in the tongue of the person she seeks, etc. (Although more experienced witches may be able to preserve some awareness of the surroundings ...)

'No mushrooms were consumed in the making of this spell'?
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Valan Nonesuch
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« Reply #3 on: 23 January 2012, 23:25:42 »

I'm misusing the term "Focus" a little Shaba. But as long as the witch continues to work the spell, the spell continues, essentially.
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Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang
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« Reply #4 on: 23 January 2012, 23:28:56 »

Valan: yes, I understand. But the language (vocabulary) is important here, I think, to make witchcraft and Ximaxianism as distinct as possible. :)
No need to take the descriptions I included, if you don't want (though you're welcome to them!) - simply replacing 'focus' by 'trance' might do the trick!


'No mushrooms were consumed in the making of this spell'?
Can't be guaranteed, I'm afraid. I think we'll need to add a disclaimer to all witch spells: "Don't try this at home."
« Last Edit: 23 January 2012, 23:30:52 by Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang » Logged

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Shabakuk Zeborius Anfang
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« Reply #5 on: 20 April 2012, 04:36:02 »

Hi Valan,

Have you plans to finish this one? It's such a splendid idea; it would be a shame if it got forgotten about.

Inquiringly,

Shabakuk
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Valan Nonesuch
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« Reply #6 on: 20 April 2012, 23:01:40 »

Hit a bit of a snag, wanted to get one more variation
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« Reply #7 on: 21 April 2012, 01:54:50 »

No worries. I'll prod you again when I can actually resume my own work on the witches. Life keeps conspiring against my return to development. It's benevolent conspiracy, mostly - but still ... *sigh*
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« Reply #8 on: 18 July 2012, 02:29:16 »

Better late than never.
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« Reply #9 on: 20 July 2012, 06:22:35 »

Quote
While other methods of casting a finding exist, among the most bizarre is that of the Cauldron Witches, who brew an particularly noxious stew, said to include such diverse and inedible materials as filings from a compass, flittermouse eyes and powdered sunflowers,

I love that!

Valan, I just returned from a three-week holiday, and have a few things to catch up with in London. Give me a few days, though, and I'll comment in detail.
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« Reply #10 on: 21 July 2012, 03:36:22 »

I've added a little more, hopefully you don't mind Shaba!
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« Reply #11 on: 22 July 2012, 23:16:54 »

Name:
Finding Charm (Pin's Point, Dowsing Rod, Searchers' Stew,) (How about a name for the rhyme witch spell? Maybe “Under Sky or in the Ground”, after your poem?)

Coven:
Needle Witches, Chisel Witches, Cauldron Witches, Rhyme Witches

Spell Level:
Witchling

Overview
A simple charm familiar to many witches is the Finding. While the means of effecting such a charm and it's its limitations differ between covens, the end result is the same. A Finding charm directs the user towards a person, object or place.

Spell Effect
A Finding will draw a person towards whatever it is meant to seek. It does not tend to do so directly, in many cases. The path a Finding shows is rarely straight-forward, and based on the skill of the witch may not hone in exactly on the target but will merely lead near to it.
Findings may also (delete 'also') be used to find living things, people or animals, as well as inanimate objects ranging from lost jewellery to ore to fertile soil.

Crafting Procedure
Needle Witches create a pin-bauble, a collection of thread and scraps of fabric or yarn sewn or knit into a pouch around an object. If the witch wishes to find a person for instance, she may use a lock of hair, a well worn piece of clothing or an item of personal significance, and craft the pin-bauble around that. Once completed, the bauble is transfixed with a pin or needle and hung from a length of string. Pin-baubles excel at finding people or animals, but falter when presented with less animate subjects.

A Chisel Witch carves a familiar forked dowsing rod. The rod is shaped like a Y, and employed with either hand on the shorter lengths of the fork, and the remaining long section of the branch pointed away from the witch. A branch must be selected, and then carved, smoothed and polished in order to function. Finally, the witch must give the dowsing rod a "scent", often accomplished by including some fragment of the object to be found in the polishing wax, be it soil, iron filings, or spring water. Dowsing rods tend to excel at finding natural things, related to the tree itself, be it good earth for plants, water to dig a well, or indeed ores, but tend to do poorly when tasked with finding animals or people.

The Rhyme Witch's method of casting is among the simplest, and some claim the weakest. The short chant may even be familiar to some, and must be repeated while turning in a circle with one's arm outstretched holding a pendulum.

Turning, turning, turn around
something's lost what must be found
Turning, turning, turn around
under sky or in the ground
Turning, turning, turn about
find it, find it, search it out!
It is said that a Rhyme Witch's finding has very little range, when compared to other Findings, hence the necessity to work this particular charm in repetition. (I am delighted by your addition of the rhyme spell. My only comment would be that there is currently no 'scenting' in the rhyme, that is, nothing to connect the spell to its object (the thing to be found). I suggest that the connection could be made within the rhyme itself, that is, by including the name of the person or animal, or words signifying the objects sought, in the rhyme. E.g., instead of 'something' in line 2 of the rhyme, the witch may say 'Valan' or 'Nonesuch'. – I like the rhyme, by the way.)

While other methods of casting a finding exist, among the most bizarre is that of the Cauldron Witches, who brew an particularly noxious stew, said to include such diverse and inedible materials as filings from a compass, flittermouse eyes and powdered sunflowers, in addition to the element that needs to be found. The "Searching Stew" requires that this last component be liquid or somehow liquefied in order to be consumed.

Really good ideas! You've described a simple but archetypical spell. Since it be accomplished by more than one craft, this makes it a fundamental spell that gives a defining image of witchcraft. Fantastic!

One comment on the Procedure section: It's not entirely clear to me how her spell leads the witch to the target. The dowsing rod, I guess, tends to point in an appropriate direction, and so do the swinging of the bauble and pendulum of the rhyme witch? Would be good to make these things explicit, I think. But what does the stew do to help the witch find anything? Your text suggests that the stew is drunk or eaten – but what does that do? One idea I had: what if the witch takes the stew in her mouth, then spits it out, and reads the 'path' to the object in the puddle of spit-out stew she has made, as if it were a map?)


Materials

Any form of Finding requires a focus, in order to direct the charm. A pin-bauble may utilize a personal effect such as a comb, favoured piece of jewellery or indeed, a well-worn sock,  :)  alongside the more typical lock of hair, tooth or a splash of blood. The container for this object is made of loose threads and scraps of fabric, or odd ends of yarn, which is then transfixed with a long needle or pin, sometimes (Better: … pin. Sometimes ...) a hair-pin is used for this purpose (add comma) but it is generally agreed that one of the implements used in crafting the bauble makes for a better focus. (I don't understand what the last sentence is telling me. Are you saying that it's better to work the focus into the bauble, rather than have the transfixing pin be the focus? Please make clear in the text.)

The dowsing rod varies from witch to witch, based purely on the wood used. Some witches swear by dowsing rods made from the soft, pliable wood of a willow branch, while others prefer frangrans fragrans, meldrapple meldarapple, malus, pine or even a twig from a redberry bush. What is agreed upon is that soft woods make for the best rods, though they are often the most difficult to carve. The branch chosen is often forked in some way and traditionally takes the shape of a Y. The chosen is carefully removed from the tree, cut and then whittled and smoothed, before finally being polished. The polishing process also includes "scenting" the rod with a small sample of what it is meant to find, similar to giving a hound a scent to follow. This varies wildly but common "scents" are iron fillings, gold flakes or dust, spring water. (So does the witch have to make a specific dowsing rod for each Finding spell, or can she use the same rod for more than one spell, overwriting a previous scent with a new polish for second or subsequent use? I would suggest the latter, although I guess after half a dozen uses or so a dowsing rod might wear off and the witch might decide to make a new one.)

You say nothing about Materials for the rhyme witch spell. Can you give us information about the pendulum, maybe? Also, I suggest that the witch would need to know the name of a person she intends to find.

Searching Stew requires a cauldron, kettle or other form of pot to brew the spell in. The exact making varies, as some will attempt to make the stew more palatable than others. What is known is that the main ingredients of the stew are rarely pleasant. Dogs' noses, bits of flittermouth or owl are included to help in the searching. Fillings from a compass are included, for the same reason, though special attention is paid not to include lodestone in stew for it ruins the mixture and draws the wrong threads. (So the witch has to drink this, yes? What if someone other than the witch drinks the stew? Also, see my 'spitting' suggestion above.)

Crafting Time
The crafting time of focus for a Finding varies based on the skill of the witch working at it. A novice who can't stop pricking her thumb with a needle will take much longer to sew a pin-bauble than a practised needle witch.

Duration

A Finding lasts as long as the witch continues to attempt it. So long as the witch continues to work the finding, her charm will continue to direct her towards its target.

Range and power

A Finding is only as good as the witch that has crafted it, though generally, there is something to be said of the quality and relative freshness of the materials, particularly in the case of finding something living.

Counterspells, defences, immunities

Animals that travel in herds are much harder to pinpoint individually. A finding may simply direct the witch to the nearest flock of sheep, rather than a single lost member of the flock. It is said that carrying a piece of lodestone makes it harder to pinpoint an individual. Some sell charms or coins made out of lodestone for just such a purpose. Otherwise work it into jewellery. (This last sentence lacks a subject, and is in any case not quite clear to me. Are you saying that people work lodestone into jewellery as a protection against witchcraft?) Attempts to find lodestone have almost always lead to the witch finding herself walking in circles. Likewise, quicksilver and cinnabar are also notorious for throwing off Findings.

Myth and Lore [optional] (Are you going to add myth and lore? If not, then delete the heading.)

All in all: a wonderful idea, executed with your accustomed clarity, erudition, and conciseness. The inclusion of no fewer than four crafts is really very valuable, as it gives several crafts their first spell entry, and thus lays important foundation stones for the development of witchcraft. It feels great to have help in this project! Aura from me.

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Valan Nonesuch
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« Reply #12 on: 23 July 2012, 08:40:45 »

Actually, the idea with a searcher's stew was that it would just draw the imbiber, with a sense "from the gut" as it were. I'll be sure to include that.

The intention with the pin bauble comment (under materials) that seems to have vexed you was that one uses the pin that is used to make the pin bauble in order to transfix the resulting charm.

For example: if the pin bauble is made using a sock as the base, the witch would sew odds and ends of thread and cloth to it with a needle. Once she is done, she could use any old pin to finish the bauble and make a focus, but ideally it would be the needle that she used to sew the bauble that is used to finish the crafting, since that particular pin might already be connected to the working of the spell itself.

I'll try to make that more clear when I make edits though.
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« Reply #13 on: 25 July 2012, 06:05:50 »

Okay, that all makes sense. Let me know when you're done with editing and want more comments.
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« Reply #14 on: 18 August 2012, 02:01:51 »

How's the Finding going, Valan? I see you've made some edits in response to the previous comments. Are you close to done? Do let me know if you want me to take another look at the text.
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